Dems’ Opening Argument: Damning, Violent Video Evidence Of Trump’s Incitement

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the US Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to ... WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images) MORE LESS
|
February 9, 2021 2:29 p.m.

Much of the evidence Democrats are expected to use in their case to convict ex-President Trump of inciting an insurrection is relatively well known — seared in our minds for the past month by live footage and violent video and photo evidence of his role in encouraging a mob of his supporters to storm the Capitol.

But those images together, laid out chronologically to juxtapose photos, videos, tweets and statements, made for a compelling, gutting opening exhibit, introduced by House impeachment manager Jamie Raskin (D-MD).

The video montage served as a stark contrast to the Republican “move-on” rhetoric of late, an attempt by Trump’s closest allies to downplay the actual violence of that day, despite many GOPers’ early condemnation of what happened in the immediate aftermath.

“Senators, the President was impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives on January 13th for doing that,” Raskin said from the Senate floor after the nearly 15 minute video montage finished playing. You asked what a high crime and misdemeanor is under our Constitution? That’s a high crime and misdemeanor. If that’s not an impeachable offense, then there is no such thing.”

Republicans are expected to focus on the constitutionality of convicting a president after he’s left office, rather than the merit of his role in the insurrection that left five people dead. 

Watch the montage below. Warning: there is graphic language and content included.

Latest News
Comments
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Senior Editor:
Special Projects Editor:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front-End Developer:
Senior Designer: