Where Is He Now? The Most Mysterious Man In Washington’s Next Steps

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 24: Ann Mueller and Special Counsel Robert Mueller walk on March 24, 2019 in Washington, DC. Special counsel Robert Mueller has delivered his report on alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 pr... WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 24: Ann Mueller and Special Counsel Robert Mueller walk on March 24, 2019 in Washington, DC. Special counsel Robert Mueller has delivered his report on alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election to Attorney General William Barr. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) MORE LESS

Everything about Special Counsel Robert Mueller is antithetical to the Trump age: he’s understated, dislikes the public eye and finds gossip beneath him.

According to a Monday New York Times report, even his restaurant of choice during his tenure as special counsel reflected that: the drab and unhip Salt & Pepper a few miles from his office where he’d eat scallops and sip white wine with friends.

The exceptionally rare sightings of Mueller — at an Apple store, at a 7-11 — only increased the intrigue around Washington’s most discussed lawyer.

Now that his report is finished, he has options. As the Times points out, he could pull a James Comey and write a tell-all — but friends say he’s too private to do that. He could take to Twitter or the lecture circuit to be a voice of authority on the dirtiest dealings in the Trump orbit.

Or he could return to his swanky D.C. law firm where he defended corporations and nonprofits from a twelfth-floor corner office.

And according to those that know him best, he is most like to slip back into that world of cufflinks and Brooks Brothers suits, away from the piercing spotlight of the two-year investigation.

Dear Reader,

When we asked recently what makes TPM different from other outlets, readers cited factors like honesty, curiosity, transparency, and our vibrant community. They also pointed to our ability to report on important stories and trends long before they are picked up by mainstream outlets; our ability to contextualize information within the arc of history; and our focus on the real-world consequences of the news.

Our unique approach to reporting and presenting the news, however, wouldn’t be possible without our readers’ support. That’s not just marketing speak, it’s true: our work would literally not be possible without readers deciding to become members. Not only does member support account for more than 80% of TPM’s revenue, our members have helped us build an engaged and informed community. Many of our best stories were born from reader tips and valuable member feedback.

We do what other news outlets can’t or won’t do because our members’ support gives us real independence.

If you enjoy reading TPM and value what we do, become a member today.

Sincerely,
TPM Staff
Latest News
Comments
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Associate Editor:
Investigations Desk:
Reporters:
Newswriters:
Director of Audience:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front End Developer:
Senior Designer: