Judge Demands Lin Wood Explain How His Behavior Did Not Violate A Court Order

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 03: British diver Vernon Unsworth; L, watches his attorneys; Mark Stephen; R, and L. Lin Wood; C, speaks to members of the media while they arrive at US District Court, Central District of California in Los Angeles, U.S. on December 3, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. The British diver sued the Tesla CEO Elon Musk over calling him "'Pedo Guy" and rapist. (Photo by Apu Gomes/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 03: Attorneys L. Lin Wood (C) and Mark Stephen (L) speak to the media about their client, British rescue diver Vernon Unsworth (rear), as they arrive at US District Court on December 3, 201... LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 03: Attorneys L. Lin Wood (C) and Mark Stephen (L) speak to the media about their client, British rescue diver Vernon Unsworth (rear), as they arrive at US District Court on December 3, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Unsworth is suing Tesla CEO Elon Musk for defamation over calling him "Pedo Guy" and rapist. (Photo by Apu Gomes/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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July 16, 2021 10:14 a.m.

Lin Wood started the week claiming that he wasn’t subject to the jurisdiction of a Michigan federal judge considering whether to sanction him over his role in spreading lies about the 2020 election.

He’s now ending it as that same judge demands to know whether he violated a court order after the same hearing.

U.S. District Judge Linda Parker for the Eastern District of Michigan issued an order on Thursday demanding that Wood explain whether his behavior after the hearing violated local court rules. Court regulations forbid attorneys from posting recordings of proceedings; Wood appeared to do exactly that hours after the hearing concluded.

At the Monday court session, Wood, Sidney Powell, and others barraged the judge with claims that the election was stolen. Parker held the hearing to determine whether Wood, Powell, and the other attorneys present should be sanctioned for lying to the court and the public about the 2020 election.

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Parker had ruled before the hearing that, while it was to be broadcast online, no recordings were permitted to be made. She issued this order saying that attorneys risked sanction if they recorded or posted recordings of the hearing.

Within two hours of the Monday hearing, Wood posted a video on his personal Telegram account of the end of the hearing.

He removed it before the end of the day.

“I was asked by my present counsel to remove the Telegram post where I had shared another channel’s recording of Sidney Powell’s comments at the end of the hearing,” Wood wrote.

In the Thursday order demanding that Wood explain how the post did not violate the earlier order, Parker wrote that Wood had “‘posted a video snippet on his more than 840,000-follower’ social media account.”

He has until July 22 to explain how that did not violate the rule against broadcasting judicial proceedings.

Wood has yet to comment on this directly. He wrote on Telegram Thursday night, “Anyone notice that the devil is in full attack mode against yours truly and has picked up the pace in the variety and viciousness of his attacks in recent days?”

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