You Asked For It, GOP: Full House Will Vote On The Process For Impeachment

UNITED STATES - JULY 24: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., makes a remark to the media about the testimony of former special counsel Robert Mueller before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 24: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., makes a remark to the media about the testimony of former special counsel Robert Mueller before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his investigation into... UNITED STATES - JULY 24: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., makes a remark to the media about the testimony of former special counsel Robert Mueller before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call) MORE LESS
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October 28, 2019 4:04 p.m.
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On the heels of a court ruling affirming that the House does not need a floor vote to launch an impeachment inquiry, Democrats will do so anyway.

A resolution on the impeachment process will be considered by the Rules Committee on Wednesday, the committee’s chairman, Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), announced Monday. The text of the resolution has not been released in full yet.

“As committees continue to gather evidence and prepare to present their findings, I will be introducing a resolution to ensure transparency and provide a clear path forward, which the Rules Committee will mark up this week,”McGovern said in his announcement.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said in a letter to her caucus that the resolution “establishes the procedure for hearings that are open to the American people, authorizes the disclosure of deposition transcripts, outlines procedures to transfer evidence to the Judiciary Committee as it considers potential articles of impeachment, and sets forth due process rights for the President and his Counsel.”

She said the vote will happen this week, reportedly as soon as Thursday.

The House Rules’ summary of the coming resolution described it as, “Directing certain committees to continue their ongoing investigations as part of the existing House of Representatives inquiry into whether sufficient grounds exist for the House of Representatives to exercise its Constitutional power to impeach Donald John Trump, President of the United States of America, and for other purposes.”

The White House and Republicans in Congress have claimed that the House impeachment inquiry — which is looking at President Trump’s Ukraine pressure campaign aimed at smearing is political rivals — is illegitimate because it was not opened with a full House vote.

White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement after the news of the vote plans that “Speaker Pelosi is finally admitting what the rest of America already knew – that Democrats were conducting an unauthorized impeachment proceeding, refusing to give the President due process, and their secret, shady, closed door depositions are completely and irreversibly illegitimate.”

A federal judge dismantled the claim that a floor vote was necessary to launch an impeachment probe, in a court decision Friday that ordered the Justice Department to produce for the House the grand jury material used in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

Pelosi in her letter said the GOP argument was “apparently” made up “out of whole cloth” … “in order to justify its unprecedented cover-up, withhold key documents from multiple federal agencies, prevent critical witnesses from cooperating, and defy duly authorized subpoenas.”

“We are taking this step to eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump Administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives,” she said.

Read the full Pelosi letter below:

Dear Democratic Colleague,

For weeks, the President, his Counsel in the White House, and his allies in Congress have made the baseless claim that the House of Representatives’ impeachment inquiry “lacks the necessary authorization for a valid impeachment proceeding.”  They argue that, because the House has not taken a vote, they may simply pretend the impeachment inquiry does not exist.

Of course, this argument has no merit.  The Constitution provides that the House of Representatives “shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.”  Multiple past impeachments have gone forward without any authorizing resolutions.  Just last week, a federal court confirmed that the House is not required to hold a vote and that imposing such a requirement would be “an impermissible intrusion on the House’s constitutional authority.”  More than 300 legal scholars have also refuted this argument, concluding that “the Constitution does not mandate the process for impeachment and there is no constitutional requirement that the House of Representatives authorize an impeachment inquiry before one begins.”

The Trump Administration has made up this argument – apparently out of whole cloth – in order to justify its unprecedented cover-up, withhold key documents from multiple federal agencies, prevent critical witnesses from cooperating, and defy duly authorized subpoenas.

This week, we will bring a resolution to the Floor that affirms the ongoing, existing investigation that is currently being conducted by our committees as part of this impeachment inquiry, including all requests for documents, subpoenas for records and testimony, and any other investigative steps previously taken or to be taken as part of this investigation.

This resolution establishes the procedure for hearings that are open to the American people, authorizes the disclosure of deposition transcripts, outlines procedures to transfer evidence to the Judiciary Committee as it considers potential articles of impeachment, and sets forth due process rights for the President and his Counsel.

We are taking this step to eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump Administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives.

Nobody is above the law.

best regards,

Nancy

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