RNC Finance Chair Resigns After Allegations Of Sexual Misconduct

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 26:  Steve Wynn, CEO of Wynn Resorts, is acknowledged at a news conference held by U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House July 26, 2017 in Washington, DC. The president was touting a decision by Apple supplier Foxconn to invest $10 billion to build a factory in Wisconsin that produces LCD panels. Foxconn said the project would create 3,000 jobs, with the "potential" to generate 13,000 new jobs, according to published reports.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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Las Vegas casino magnate Steve Wynn resigned as finance director of the Republican National Committee on Saturday following a Wall Street Journal report surfacing allegations of sexual misconduct against Wynn.

Politico was first to report Wynn’s resignation, and RNC Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel later confirmed in a brief statement that she accepted Wynn’s resignation, though she did not share the reason for Wynn’s departure.

“Today I accepted Steve Wynn’s resignation as Republican National Committee finance chair,” McDaniel said in the statement.

McDaniel did not indicate whether the RNC would return donations from Wynn, a longtime ally of President Donald Trump.

Wynn said in a statement to Politico that he resigned because he had become a “distraction”

The Wall Street Journal reported “dozens” of accounts from employees at Wynn resorts who said that Wynn had a pattern of sexual misconduct. He allegedly pressured a manicurist to have sex with him, and the manucurist was later paid a $7.5 million settlement, per the Journal. A deposition from the 1990s from an executive at one of Wynn’s casinos said that he “routinely received complaints from various department heads regarding Wynn’s chronic sexual harassment of female employees,” per the Journal.

Wynn told the Wall Street Journal that the “idea that I ever assaulted any woman is preposterous.”

 

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