New Yorker Cuts Ties With Ryan Lizza Over ‘Improper Sexual Conduct’

The New Yorker on Monday announced it had “severed ties” with prominent political reporter Ryan Lizza over what the magazine called “improper sexual conduct.”

“The New Yorker recently learned that Ryan Lizza engaged in what we believe was improper sexual conduct,” a New Yorker spokesperson said in a statement to TPM. “We have reviewed the matter and, as a result, have severed ties with Lizza. Due to a request for privacy, we are not commenting further.”

Lizza was the magazine’s Washington correspondent, a CNN political analyst and an adjunct lecturer at Georgetown University.

“We have just learned of the New Yorker’s decision,” a CNN spokesperson told TPM in a statement Monday afternoon. “Ryan Lizza will not appear on CNN while we look into this matter.”

“Georgetown recently learned of the New Yorker’s actions,” a spokesperson for the university told TPM. “Classes have concluded for the fall semester at the University. Mr. Lizza will not be teaching any classes next semester.”

Lizza said in a statement that he was “dismayed” by the New Yorker’s description of his behavior, which he characterized as “a respectful relationship with a woman I dated.”

“The New Yorker was unable to cite any company policy that was violated,” he claimed. “This decision, which was made hastily and without a full investigation of the relevant facts, was a terrible mistake.”

Wigdor LLP, an employment law firm in New York, on Monday said it is representing “the victim” of Lizza’s “misconduct.”

“Although she desires to remain confidential and requests that her privacy be respected in no way did Mr. Lizza’s misconduct constitute a ‘respectful relationship’ as he has now tried to characterize it,” the firm said in a statement.

In July, then-White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci called Lizza and regaled him with a profanity-laced rant about then-White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and then-chief White House strategist Steve Bannon.

As of Monday afternoon, Lizza’s staff biography on the New Yorker’s website had been converted to the past tense.

This post has been updated.

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