Ron Fournier Compares Obamacare Rollout To Bush’s Handling Of The Iraq War (VIDEO)

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October 23, 2013 8:33 a.m.

Ron Fournier, a National Journal columnist, on Tuesday compared President Obama’s approach to the health care website rollout to President George W. Bush’s handling of the Iraq War and Hurricane Katrina.

“Just like Katrina, when the big problem President Bush had was diminishing the significance of what was happening, saying ‘Hey, way to go, Brownie,’—you had the president yesterday talking about glitches and kinks. This is bigger than glitches and kinks,” Fournier said on MSNBC, as quoted by Mediate. “The one difference was Katrina was a storm, the health care law was Obama’s creation.”

Fournier then added, “Maybe the Iraq War is a better analogy.”

Nicolle Wallace, a former communications director for Bush, also criticized Obama on MSNBC for not taking a larger role in trying to fix the problems with the website.

“The notion he’s sitting and watching from the residence of the White House and says, ‘Oh, gosh, that didn’t go well’ just rings really strange to people,” she said. “But Obama, to continue to speak about the actions of his administration as a guy with a great seat but no responsibility, is totally off-putting, and it does not have a whiff of leadership to it.”

Watch: 

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