Those White Supremacist Easter Eggs Were Found In Other States, Too

AP

It wasn’t just Virginia. Easter eggs stuffed with racist messages were also found last weekend in parts of Kentucky and California. And we may also now know who came up with the idea.

WAVE 3 News in Kentucky reported this week that five of the eggs were found in Lexington, Ky. Inside the eggs were printed notes reading “Diversity is a Code Word for WHITE GENOCIDE,” along with a link to a Facebook page for a group called “American White History Month 1.” The eggs appear to be similar to the ones found by parents in Henrico County, Va.

And according to Vice, similar messages were discovered in eggs in Oakdale, Calif. Cheryl Wolford, a resident of Oakdale, told Vice that around 30 houses in her neighborhood found the eggs on Good Friday.

“We had an Easter egg hunt on Good Friday, and our kids found these messages,” Wolford said. “This is a diverse and close-knit town. This is no place for that sort of stuff.”

Wolford said she remembered one of the strips of paper found in the eggs said, “Diversity is our strength, Diversity is our future, Diversity is why Chicago is so peaceful.”

Vice found a statement lauding the racist eggs effort issued by a white supremacist organization called the White Genocide Project.

“The Easter eggs may have been delivered by some of our good friends over at the WhiteManMarch.com, great work!” a blog post on White Genocide Project’s website said Sunday.

The “White Man March” was an attempt at “coordinated pro-white activity” that fizzled in March. Until recently, the movement was led by Kyle Hunt. And it looks like the idea for the eggs began with Hunt.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, Hunt recently published a blog post on his website urging supporters to “buy some of those really cheap plastic Easter eggs, maybe put in something for a little bit of weight, and include a small strip of paper in there with some of our material printed on one side, with your favorite websites printed on the back.” That blog post appears to have been taken offline.

Vice got in touch with Hunt this week. He refused to discuss the Easter eggs, and told Vice that he was no longer involved in White Man March, and that he had taken the website down.

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Eric Lach is a reporter for TPM. From 2010 to 2011, he was a news writer in charge of the website?s front page. He has previously written for The Daily, NewYorker.com, GlobalPost and other publications. He can be reached at ericl@talkingpointsmemo.com
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