Sanders Is Assessing His Campaign After Another Disappointing Primary Finish

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: In this screengrab taken from a berniesanders.com webcast, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) talks about his plan to deal with the coronavirus pandemic on March 1... WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: In this screengrab taken from a berniesanders.com webcast, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) talks about his plan to deal with the coronavirus pandemic on March 17, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Businesses are being severely impacted, schools are closing temporarily and large events are being postponed as the COVID-19 virus continues to spread across the country. (Photo by berniesanders.com via Getty Images) MORE LESS
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March 18, 2020 11:05 a.m.
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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is assessing his campaign after former Vice President Joe Biden swept all three primaries Tuesday night.

On Tuesday night, it didn’t take long after polls closed for networks to project Biden as the winner in Florida and Illinois. Arizona was still too early to call at the end of Tuesday night, but the former VP was projected to win the state’s Democratic primary the next morning. Although Ohio was originally scheduled to hold its primaries Tuesday, the state postponed its in-person contest to June 2 in light of the COVID-19 outbreak.

In a statement shared with TPM, Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir said that the Vermont senator will have “conversations with supporters to assess his campaign.”

Acknowledging that the next primaries are at least three weeks away, Shakir also mentioned in the statement that Sanders will focus his attention on the government’s response to the coronavirus outbreak and taking care of working people as well as “the most vulnerable.”

Sanders’ latest setback came just a few days after his first Democratic primary debate narrowing down to a two-man race.

Last week, after Biden scored major wins in the Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi and Idaho Democratic primaries, Sanders admitted that it was “not a good night for our campaign from a delegate point of view” but that he’d continue his campaign.

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