FBI Warns Other Domestic Violent Extremists Could Become ‘Inspired’ By El Paso

FBI agents check vehicles outside the Cielo Vista Mall Wal-Mart (background) where a shooting left 20 people dead in El Paso, Texas, on August 4, 2019. - Texas authorities are investigating the Saturday mass shooting... FBI agents check vehicles outside the Cielo Vista Mall Wal-Mart (background) where a shooting left 20 people dead in El Paso, Texas, on August 4, 2019. - Texas authorities are investigating the Saturday mass shooting at a Walmart store in El Paso as a possible hate crime, the city's police chief said, as authorities study an online manifesto linked to the suspect. A 21-year-old from Allen, a suburb of Dallas, surrendered to police outside the store after the rampage that left 20 people dead and 26 wounded.US media identified him as Patrick Crusius, who is white, and linked him to a "manifesto" posted online that includes passages railing against the "Hispanic invasion" of Texas. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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August 5, 2019 11:11 a.m.
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The FBI late Sunday warned that Saturday’s shooting massacre in El Paso that left 20 people dead could prompt other violent acts of extremism in the future.

The shooting is being investigated as an act of domestic terror and authorities are considering pursuing hate crime charges against the suspected shooter.

The suspect, Patrick Crusius, allegedly killed 20 people and injured more than two dozen others after he shot up a Walmart. Authorities are currently investigating whether Crusius wrote a racist manifesto online ranting against a so-called “Hispanic invasion.”

“The attack in El Paso, Texas, underscores the continued threat posed by domestic violent extremists and perpetrators of hate crimes,” the FBI said in an official statement.

“The FBI remains concerned that U.S.-based domestic violent extremists could become inspired by these and previous high-profile attacks to engage in similar acts of violence,” the agency also said. “The FBI asks the American public to report to law enforcement any suspicious activity that is observed either in person or online.”

FBI Director Christopher Wray offered his “sincere condolences” to the victims and their families in the statement.

“We will bring the full resources of the FBI to bear in the pursuit of justice for the victims of these crimes,” he said.

Wray had previously alerted Congress to his agency’s comparatively high rates of domestic terrorist arrests this year that were linked to white supremacy.

President Donald Trump, meanwhile, has downplayed the rising level of white nationalism in the country, saying he “doesn’t really” think it’s a threat.

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