Top Senate Intel Dem Suggests There’s More To Come On Stone And Wikileaks

Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., and Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, listen as Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence about his role in the firing of FBI Director James Comey and the investigation into contacts between Trump campaign associates and Russia, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - In this June 13, 2017, file photo, Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., listens during a committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Warner said an overhaul of the security clea... FILE - In this June 13, 2017, file photo, Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., listens during a committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Warner said an overhaul of the security clearance process is long overdue, particularly if the U.S. government is going to continue to attract top-notch workers and recent graduates, and not hamper transitions of mid-career intelligence professionals from agency to agency. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) MORE LESS
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January 25, 2019 12:08 p.m.

After a federal grand jury indictment of President Trump ally Roger Stone, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee suggested there’s more yet to become public on Stone and his involvement with Wikileaks.

“I expect that we will learn more about Mr. Stone’s campaign role, his communications regarding Wikileaks, and who else knew about Stone’s efforts,” Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) said in a Friday morning statement.

The Senate Intelligence Committee has interviewed several top Trump allies, including Paul Manafort, the former campaign chair who was close to Stone, and Steve Bannon, who it appears was in communication with Stone about Wikileaks’ release of Democrats’ hacked emails. Those interviews and additional intelligence that the committee is privy to have not been made public.

Stone was indicted on one count of obstructing an official proceeding, five counts of false statements, and one count of witness tampering, all stemming from his alleged attempts to communicate with both Wikileaks and the Trump campaign about Democrats’ stolen emails during the 2016 campaign.

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