Study: Even With Dynamic Scoring, GOP Tax Bill Still Blows Up The Deficit

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., takes questions from reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017, a day before visiting hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico with a bipartisan delegation to assess the destruction. The House is on track to deliver disaster aid, $16 billion to pay flood insurance claims, and emergency funding to help the cash-strapped government of Puerto Rico stay afloat. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., takes questions from reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017, a day before visiting hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico with a bipartisan delegation to asses... Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., takes questions from reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017, a day before visiting hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico with a bipartisan delegation to assess the destruction. The House is on track to deliver disaster aid, $16 billion to pay flood insurance claims, and emergency funding to help the cash-strapped government of Puerto Rico stay afloat. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) MORE LESS
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November 20, 2017 2:52 p.m.

On Monday, the Tax Policy Center released a new analysis of the House tax bill that disproves claims from GOP leadership and the Trump administration that the deep tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy will create so much economic growth that the bill will pay for itself.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin recently insisted that “not only will this tax plan pay for itself, but it will pay down debt.” White House economic adviser Gary Cohn agreed, saying that “we can pay for the entire tax cut through growth over the cycle.”

Yet the new study by the Tax Policy Center finds that while the bill would somewhat boost the nation’s economic output, leading to more revenue for the government, it would not be enough to offset the revenue lost by the tax cuts. The net effect of the bill would be to increase the deficit by $1.27 trillion over 10 years.

The estimated growth would be lower than promised and the impact would diminish over time. The Tax Policy Center estimates that the tax cuts would increase the U.S. GDP by 0.6 percent in 2018, 0.3 percent in 2027, and 0.2 percent in 2037.

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The revenue generated by the growth would be about $169 billion over 10 years—a drop in the bucket to the revenue the government would lose over that same period.

This study echoes the findings of other analyses—including one conducted by President Trump’s alma mater, the Wharton School of Business—showing that even when taking growth into account through so-called dynamic scoring, the tax bill would still balloon the deficit.

Read the full report below:

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