A new analysis by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center breaks down who would benefit most and least from the tax cuts that would come with Obamacare repeal, assuming Republicans follow the model of their 2015 repeal legislation. It found that those in the top quintile would see their after-tax income rise by 0.8 percent due to the various cuts in the law, while those on the lower end of the earning scale would see their after-tax income decrease, mainly because of the loss of the law's tax credits to subsidize buying insurance.

As the TPC explains, the multiple moving parts of an Obamacare repeal affect taxpayers in different ways and the variation is wide even within each income group. The ACA tax credits play a major role in determining the losers, but even if they are excluded from consideration, those on the bottom and the middle benefit from the tax cuts far less than those on the top.

For instance, a vast majority (94 percent) of middle-income households (making between $52,000 and $89,000) do see a small tax cut that averages around $110, but three percent of middle-income earners would see a massive tax hike, averaging $6,200, because of the elimination of the tax credits for insurance plans purchased through the individual exchanges.

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Only 11 percent of Donald Trump supporters said they were "very confident" that votes across the country will be counted accurately in the upcoming election, according to a new Pew survey, while half of his backers say they are "not too confident" or "not at all confident" that those votes will be counted correctly.

The findings, released Friday, come after weeks of Trump comments in campaign speeches and in interviews that if he lost to Hillary Clinton it would be because the election was "rigged."

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The United States continues to experience a drop in the number of Mexican immigrants seeking the American dream.

The Pew Research Center estimates that 1 million Mexican immigrants have departed the U.S. since the great recession began in 2009. Meanwhile, only 870,000 immigrants have left their homes in Mexico to reside in the United States during that same time period.

Experts believe that a bolster in border security as well as the United States' economic rocky recovery has made the it less of a magnet for Mexican immigrants.

Republicans are more likely to view Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) unfavorably than favorably, a Gallup survey released Thursday finds. For the first time in the five years the survey has been taken, more Republicans (35 percent) view the Kentuckian negatively than positively (30 percent). A year and a half ago, Republicans were twice as likely to view him favorably than unfavorably.

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For the first time since the spike after the 2013 Newtown shooting, a majority of Americans support for stricter gun laws, a Gallup poll released Monday finds. Fifty-five percent of Americans say the laws covering the sale of firearms should be more strict, up from 47 percent in 2014. Meanwhile, only 33 percent said gun laws should remain as they are and 11 percent would like to see laws loosened up.

For the survey, Gallup polled 1,015 adults nationwide via telephone interviews from Oct. 7-11, 2015. The poll has a margin of error of 4 percentage points.

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