Report: Warrants Issued For White Supremacist Featured In Vice Film

Vice News

Charlottesville police have reportedly issued warrants for the arrest of Christopher Cantwell, a white supremacist prominently featured in a Vice News documentary.

Cantwell is wanted for his involvement in the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last weekend, where a counter-protester was killed when a man affiliated with white nationalists allegedly drove his car through a crowd.

The warrants are for illegal use of gases and injury by caustic agent or explosive, the Boston Globe reported.

Charlottesville police did not immediately respond to TPM’s request for confirmation.

Cantwell posted a tearful video on YouTube earlier this week after apparently learning there were warrants out for his arrest.

“I don’t want to. I don’t think I should. I honestly think that I have been law-abiding,” Cantwell said in the video, outlining the work his group did to gain a permit to assemble for the “Unite the Right” rally last weekend.

The group claims they gathered to protest the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville.

Another group that’s attempting to assemble in Boston this weekend — that claims they’re not affiliated with the “Unite the Right” group, despite advertising similar supporters and speakers — was given a permit to assemble this weekend.

The city set restrictions on the kind of activity that can occur, AP reported. No backpacks will be allowed or anything that resembles a weapon.

The city is allowing the Boston Free Speech group to assemble for two hours, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., and will only let 100 people into the gathering, though some supporters think as many as 1,000 could show up.

According to Cantwell, the FBI reached out to him to aide in efforts to keep the Boston rally from becoming violent like the one in Charlottesville, the AP reported. He said he would help, but said he did not know the organizers of the free speech protest.

In the Vice documentary, Cantwell explains his white nationalist views and his hatred for Jewish people. He said he thinks “a lot more people are gonna die before we’re done here,” responding to reports of the death of Charlottesville counter-protester Heather Heyer allegedly at the hands of a man who claimed to be an ally of white supremacists. 

He told the AP he wouldn’t attend the Boston rally because he wouldn’t be able to carry a gun.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nicole Lafond is a news writer for TPM based in New York City. She is also currently earning a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University and previously worked as an education reporter at The News-Gazette in Champaign, Ill. Follow her on Twitter @Nicole_Lafond.
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