Lewandowski: Actually, We All Steamed Trump’s Trousers While He Wore Them

President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on Thursday said that one of his jobs in 2016 was to steam his boss’ trousers, while Trump was still wearing them.

“From the book, why does Hope Hicks, the director of communications, have to steam the President’s pants?” Alisyn Camerota asked Lewandowski on CNN’s “New Day,” referring to an anecdote in Lewandowski’s campaign memoir, “Let Trump Be Trump.”

In the book, Lewandowski wrote that Hicks “would take out the steamer and start steaming Mr. Trump’s suit, while he was wearing it! She’d steam the jacket first and then sit in a chair in front of him and steam his pants.”

“Everybody does everything on the campaign,” Lewandowski replied. “What I didn’t put in there was that Keith Schiller and George Gigicos and Corey Lewandowski all do the same thing, and Corey goes and does the food runs, and—”

Schiller was Trump’s personal bodyguard, and later worked for Trump briefly in the White House. George Gigicos was the director of Trump’s advance team.

“Hold on. Hold on, Corey,” Camerota interjected.

“That’s—it was five people!” Lewandowski said.

“Do you steam the President’s pants while he’s wearing them?” Camerota interrupted.

“Look, I would—of course!” Lewandowski replied. “I mean, look, when you’re in a rush, Alisyn, we’re doing 25 events a day and we’re stopped on the airplane for 15 seconds, we’re going to make sure that things are ready, and if that’s part of my job as a campaign manager, I do it all.”

Camerota also asked Lewandowski about what he said Trump would order for dinner from McDonald’s: “two Big Macs, two Fillet-O-Fish, and a chocolate malted.”

“When the President would order for dinner two Big Macs, two Filet-o-Fish sandwiches and a chocolate milkshake and eat all of that, were you concerned about him?” Camerota asked.

“Well, he never ate the bread, which is the important part,” Lewandowski replied.

The Washington Post reported on Trump’s unique personal nutritional theory in 2016: Apparently the President largely avoided exercise after graduating college, because he “believed the human body was like a battery, with a finite amount of energy, which exercise only depleted.”

Trump’s attempts at sartorial efficiency are less unique. Netflix in 2013 released a video clip from a documentary on former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who tried to iron a suit while he was wearing it: “Ouch.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Esme Cribb is a newswriter for TPM in New York City. She can be found on Twitter @emquiry and reached by email at esme@talkingpointsmemo.com.

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