Kobach Says People Who Are Canceling Voter Registration Might Not Be Citizens

Thad Allton/TOPEKA CAPITAL-JOURNAL

After the state of Colorado announced it would comply with the White House’s bogus “election integrity” panel’s request to share voter data, hundreds of Denver-area residents cancelled their voter registration to keep their private information safe, according to a report from local KDVR News.

But the man leading the panel, Kansas Secretary of StateKris Kobach thinks it’s just a “political stunt.”

In an interview with Breitbart News Thursday, Kobach said he heard about the wave of residents unregistering, and called the move “interesting” and likened it to a “political stunt.”

“It could be a number of things. It could be, actually, people who are not qualified to vote, perhaps someone who is a felon and is disqualified that way or someone who is not a U.S. citizen saying, ‘I’m withdrawing my voter registration because I am not able to vote,’” he said. “It could be a political stunt – people who are trying to discredit the commission and withdrawing temporarily because they are politically active but planning to get back on the voter rolls before the election next November.”

Kobach is at the helm of a presidential advisory commission that’s been tasked with investigating voter fraud, which President Donald Trump claimed was an epidemic in the U.S. throughout his campaign, despite no evidence to suggest such an issue.

Last month, the commission asked all 50 states to share voter data with the commission, everything from addresses and political party affiliation to military status and the last four digits of social security numbers.

The majority of states either outright rejected the request or were only willing to share publicly available data. Since Colorado indicted it would comply with the request, more than 1,000 people in the Denver area have taken their names off registration rolls, according to KDVR.

On top of the widespread non-compliance and criticism, the commission also faces five different lawsuits from groups like the American Civil Liberties Union and the Lawyers Committee on Human Rights, which filed complaints because the commission isn’t following federal open meeting laws.

“Who knows what’s causing it, but the fact that just studying the issue of voter fraud has tapped such a raw nerve among these organizations like the ACLU tells you that they really, really don’t want a presidential commission finding out what there is to see,” he said.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nicole Lafond is a news writer for TPM based in New York City. She is also currently earning a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University and previously worked as an education reporter at The News-Gazette in Champaign, Ill. Follow her on Twitter @Nicole_Lafond.
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