Matt_shuham_profile2019

Matt Shuham

Matt Shuham is a news writer for TPM. He was previously associate editor of The National Memo and managing editor of the Harvard Political Review. He is available by email at mshuham@talkingpointsmemo.com and on Twitter @mattshuham.

Articles by Matt

Millions of people from Dhaka to San Salvador and dozens of cities in between marched and carried signs on Friday demanding action as part of the Global Climate Strike.

Getty had photographers stationed worldwide to capture the protests. Check out some of their work below:

SEATTLE, WA - SEPTEMBER 20: Amazon and other tech employees walkout during the Global Climate Strike on September 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.In what could be the largest climate protest in history inspired by the teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, people around the world are taking to the streets to demand climate change. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)
SEATTLE, WA – SEPTEMBER 20: Amazon and other tech employees walkout during the Global Climate Strike on September 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.In what could be the largest climate protest in history inspired by the teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, people around the world are taking to the streets to demand climate change. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND – SEPTEMBER 20: Protesters march and hold placards as they attend the Global Climate Strike on September 20, 2019 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Millions of people are taking to the streets around the world to take part in protests inspired by the teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg. Students are preparing to walk out of lessons in what could be the largest climate protest in history. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 20: Crowds listen to Jeremy Corbyn and other speakers at Millbank on September 20, 2019 in London, England. Millions of people are taking to the streets around the world to take part in protests inspired by the teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg. Students are preparing to walk out of lessons in what could be the largest climate protest in history. (Photo by Guy Smallman / Getty Images)
DHAKA, BANGLADESH – SEPTEMBER 20: School students and protesters gather during a climate strike rally on September 20, 2019 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Students and adults joined together on Friday as part of a global mass day of protest to demand action on climate change. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)
DHAKA, BANGLADESH – SEPTEMBER 20: School students and protesters gather during a climate strike rally on September 20, 2019 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Students and adults joined together on Friday as part of a global mass day of protest to demand action on climate change. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)
JAKARTA, INDONESIA – SEPTEMBER 20: Students activists participate in a demonstration calling for action on climate change on September 20, 2019 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Students and adults joined together on Friday as part of a global mass day to demand action on climate change. (Photo by Ed Wray/Getty Images)
Environmental activists participate during the Global Strike 4 Climate event in Bangkok, Thailand, 20 September 2019. (Photo by Anusak Laowilas/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 20: Thousands of youth gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building as part of the Global Climate Strike protests on September 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Thousands of people across the United States, and the world, are taking to the streets today to strike for greater action to combat climate change. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 20: People gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building as part of the Global Climate Strike protests on September 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Thousands of people across the United States, and the world, are taking to the streets today to strike for greater action to combat climate change. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 20: Young activists and their supporters rally for action on climate change on September 20, 2019 in New York City. Thousands of young people across the globe are participating in a day of protest calling for urgent action to fight climate change in what organizers are calling the Global Climate Strike. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 20: Young activists and their supporters rally for action on climate change on September 20, 2019 in New York City. Thousands of young people across the globe are participating in a day of protest calling for urgent action to fight climate change in what organizers are calling the Global Climate Strike. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
FRANKFURT AM MAIN, GERMANY – SEPTEMBER 20: Participants in the Fridays For Future movement protest during a nationwide climate change action day on September 20, 2019 in Frankfurt, Germany. Fridays for Future protests and strikes are registered today in over 400 cities across Germany. The activists are demanding that the German government and corporations take a fast-track policy route towards lowering CO2 emissions and combating the warming of the Earth’s temperatures. (Photo by Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images)
School students and protesters gather for a climate strike march on September 20, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. Fridays for Future global strike attracted hundreds of thousands of school students and adult protesters to march on the streets of Berlin to demand action on climate change. Similar protest took place in most major cities around the globe. (Photo by Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto)
School students and protesters gather for a climate strike march on September 20, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. Fridays for Future global strike attracted hundreds of thousands of school students and adult protesters to march on the streets of Berlin to demand action on climate change. Similar protest took place in most major cities around the globe. (Photo by Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
SANTIAGO, CHILE – SEPTEMBER 19: Young demonstrators hold up a sign that reads ‘Fridays 4 future Santiago’ during the global climate strike at Plaza Italia on September 20, 2019 in Santiago, Chile. Strikes are being held all around the world to protest against government and business inaction on climate change. This initiative is led by 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg ahead of the Climate Action Summit to be held on September 23. (Photo by Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images)
SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR - SEPTEMBER 20: Students participate in a strike on September 20, 2019 in San Salvador, El Salvador. Strikes are being held all around the world to protest against government and business inaction on climate change. This initiative is led by 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg ahead of the Climate Action Summit to be held on September 23. (Photo by Camilo Freedman/APHOTOGRAFIA/Getty Images)
SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR – SEPTEMBER 20: Students hold up banners during the Global Climate Strike on September 20, 2019 in San Salvador, El Salvador. Strikes are being held all around the world to protest against government and business inaction on climate change. This initiative is led by 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg ahead of the Climate Action Summit to be held on September 23. (Photo by Camilo Freedman/APHOTOGRAFIA/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 20: Young activists and their supporters hold signs as they march during a Global Climate Strike demonstration on September 20, 2019 in San Francisco, California. Thousands of young people across the globe are participating in a day of protest calling for urgent action to fight climate change in what organizers are calling the Global Climate Strike. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN – SEPTEMBER 20: Participants gather at United Nations University prior to Global Climate Strike on September 20, 2019 in Tokyo, Japan. Students and adults joined together on Friday as part of a global mass day to demand action on climate change. (Photo by Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LA – SEPTEMBER 20: Students participate in a global climate strike at Tulane University on September 20, 2019 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Thousands of Americans across the country joined the global strike demanding action on the climate crisis. (Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images)

Trump admin to California: You have no choice, make your cars less fuel efficient. On Thursday, the EPA and Department of Transportation officially barred California (and other states who’ve joined the nation’s largest) from setting higher fuel economy standards than the federal government. That’s a big deal: California and its compatriots are to cars what Texas is to history textbooks — a market so large it affects the national reality.

By lowering the national standard and prohibiting higher state-by-state standards, the President is also forcing car manufacturers into a position they’ve actively resisted. In June, 17 automakers including Ford, GM, Toyota and Volvo wrote to the administration, urging them not to water down standards that they’ve already spent time and energy meeting. No dice. In addition to strong-arming their way toward dirtier cars, the administration is reportedly pursuing an anti-trust case against manufacturers who’ve insisted on maintaining the California standard.

The kicker?

The administration bizarrely insists that requiring less fuel efficient cars will actually benefit safety and air quality in the long run. How? EPA Administrator Wheeler restated the administration’s argument Thursday — “by reducing the price of new vehicles to help more Americans purchase newer, cleaner, and safer cars and trucks.”

In other California news, the President threatened San Francisco with an EPA citation for its homeless population. “They have to clean it up,” he said. “We can’t have our cities going to hell.” It’s just the latest attempt by Trump to use vulnerable people as political piñatas. His latest threat ignores the fact that the Trump administration has refused giving more money to California to help its homeless residents.

USDA to let slaughterhouses inspect themselves: A new hog slaughter inspection rule from the Trump administration (though years in the making) changes how the industry is held to quality standards, shifting some inspection work to pork producers themselves, away from government workers. The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service chief veterinarian told the Washington Post of the draft proposal in April: “This could pass, and everything could be okay for a while, until some disease is missed, and we have an outbreak all over the country.” Also included in the proposal: lifting speed limits on processing lines.

Wilbur Ross, again, forgets about stock he promised to divest. A new report from Forbes’ dogged Ross-watcher Dan Alexander details yet another investment that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross promised to divest but didn’t. It’s not a large sum, and as Ross asserted in a statement, divestment wasn’t legally required. But, Alexander writes, “Ross retained financial ties to America’s greatest economic adversary [China] well into 2019 … and he continues to own an interest in shipping businesses to this day.” Sound familiar? It’s not your imagination.

Finally, another edition of “The Regulated Become The Regulators.” This time, at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

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Conservative radio host Lars Larson brags that his radio show is broadcast on over 20 stations in the Pacific Northwest and has featured interviews with everyone from Paul Ryan to Sean “Commander” Spicer, as Larson referred to the then-press secretary over Skype in the White House briefing room last year.

But on Thursday last week, Larson offered something a little different to his thousands of listeners: A detailed plan on how to “slaughter” scores of left wing activists in their sleep.

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