The Chief Justice Could Step In If There’s A Tie Vote. But Will He?

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 25: U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts leaves after day five of the Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol January 25, 2020 in Washington, DC.... WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 25: U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts leaves after day five of the Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol January 25, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump’s defense team started to present its arguments today in the Senate impeachment trial. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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January 30, 2020 5:28 p.m.

There’s a historic precedent for Chief Justice John Roberts serving as a tie-breaker in the impending Senate votes on the allowance of witnesses or acquittal. But the chief justice has done little to indicate he’d engage in political theatrics.

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