Debunking The GOP Argument That It Was The House’s Job To Call Witnesses

WASHINGTON D.C. -- FEBRUARY 12: President Bill Clinton emerges from the Oval Office to talk to the media after learning that the U.S. Senate voted to acquit him of the charges of perjury and obstruction of justice during his Impeachment Trial on Feb. 12, 1999. The charges stemmed from his relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly)
WASHINGTON D.C. -- FEBRUARY 12: President Bill Clinton emerges from the Oval Office to talk to the media after learning that the U.S. Senate voted to acquit him of the charges of perjury and obstruction of justice du... WASHINGTON D.C. -- FEBRUARY 12: President Bill Clinton emerges from the Oval Office to talk to the media after learning that the U.S. Senate voted to acquit him of the charges of perjury and obstruction of justice during his Impeachment Trial on Feb. 12, 1999. The charges stemmed from his relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly) MORE LESS
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January 27, 2020 3:34 p.m.

A primary Republican talking point, recycled again Monday by Sens. Mike Braun (R-IN) and John Barrasso (R-WY) in the aftermath of John Bolton’s newest Ukraine revelation, is that it was the House investigators’ job to call witnesses — and that if they failed to get everyone they wanted, it’s not the Senate’s job to pick up their slack.

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