White House Mystery: Where Is Macron’s Gifted Oak Tree?

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23:  U.S. President Donald Trump, U.S. first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron participate in a tree-planting ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. The European Sessile Oak is a gift from the Macrons and comes from Belleau Woods, where more than 9,000 American marines died in June 1918 during the First World War. According to the first lady's office "The forest is a memorial site and important symbol of the sacrifice the United States made to ensure peace and stability in Europe." (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: U.S. President Donald Trump, U.S. first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron participate in a tree-planting ceremony on the South Lawn of the W... WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: U.S. President Donald Trump, U.S. first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron participate in a tree-planting ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House April 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. The European Sessile Oak is a gift from the Macrons and comes from Belleau Woods, where more than 9,000 American marines died in June 1918 during the First World War. According to the first lady's office "The forest is a memorial site and important symbol of the sacrifice the United States made to ensure peace and stability in Europe." (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) MORE LESS
WASHINGTON (AP) — A mystery is brewing at the White House about what happened to the oak tree President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron planted there last week.

The sapling was a gift from Macron on the occasion of his state visit.

News photographers snapped away Monday when Trump and Macron shoveled dirt onto the tree during a ceremonial planting on the South Lawn. By the end of the week, the tree was gone from the lawn. A pale patch of grass was left in its place.

The White House hasn’t offered an explanation.

The oak sprouted at a World War I battle site that became part of U.S. Marine Corps legend.

About 2,000 U.S. troops died in the June 1918 Battle of Belleau Wood, fighting a German offensive.

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