What To Do If You Encounter Armed Militias At Your Polling Place

Oathkeeper militia members are confronted by demonstrators protesting the lack of criminal charges in the police killing of Breonna Taylor, in downtown Louisville, Kentucky on September 24, 2020. - More than 1,000 pe... Oathkeeper militia members are confronted by demonstrators protesting the lack of criminal charges in the police killing of Breonna Taylor, in downtown Louisville, Kentucky on September 24, 2020. - More than 1,000 people defied a second night of curfew in the US city of Louisville to protest over the lack of criminal charges in the police killing of Breonna Taylor, with some seeking refuge in a church. Two officers were shot during clashes in Louisville a day earlier, after authorities announced a grand jury had decided not to charge anyone in connection with the death of Taylor -- a 26-year-old black woman shot dead in her apartment by police earlier this year. (Photo by Jeff Dean / AFP) (Photo by JEFF DEAN/AFP via Getty Images) MORE LESS

Have you shown up to vote only to encounter a team of armed men acting like law enforcement? Now there’s a resource for you. 

Between his recent appeal to a right-wing gang and his campaign’s creation of an “army” for “election security,” President Donald Trump and his allies have fueled concerns in recent weeks that voters will experience intimidation at their polling places.

Georgetown Law’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection published a website on Friday that may help: A state-by-state guide to the laws governing “unauthorized private militia groups,” as well as a checklist for voters to consult if they see a militia at the polls. Look up your state’s laws here.

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