We Were ‘Required By Law’ To Turn Over Call Records To Congress, AT&T Says

380909 04: The AT&T logo is seen on the safety helmet of advance-line technician Fred Murray October 26, 2000 in Des Plaines, Illinois. On October 25, 2000, AT&T Corp. announced that it was breaking itself up... 380909 04: The AT&T logo is seen on the safety helmet of advance-line technician Fred Murray October 26, 2000 in Des Plaines, Illinois. On October 25, 2000, AT&T Corp. announced that it was breaking itself up into four smaller companies for the third time since 1984, scrapping its vision of one-stop shopping for communications services, and dismantling a telephone and cable TV empire that took three years and more than $100 billion to build. The widely expected breakup will create four distinct entities, including an independent cable company and an independent wireless company, all operating under the AT&T brand name. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Newsmakers) MORE LESS
|
December 3, 2019 4:16 p.m.

Phone records provided by AT&T to the House impeachment inquiry provided some of the most concrete evidence yet of the behind-the-scenes machinery that fueled President Donald Trump’s pressure campaign on Ukraine.

The company said Tuesday that it was “required by law” to provide the records.

Dozens of footnotes in the inquiry’s report, which was released Tuesday, cite “AT&T Document production,” and, taken together, the call records suggest that Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was in touch with White House officials at key moments during the pressure campaign.

Asked if AT&T was subpoenaed for the records and if it provided all of the records that the impeachment inquiry had requested, a spokesperson for the company didn’t answer specifically.

“Like all companies, we are required by law to provide information to government and law enforcement agencies,” spokesperson Jim Greer said.

“In all cases, we ensure that requests for assistance are valid and that we act in compliance with the law.”

Latest News
Comments are now Members-Only

Non-members are still able to read comments, but will no longer be able to participate. To join the conversation, sign up now and get:

30% Off Annual Prime Membership

TPM strives to build as inclusive a community as financially possible. We offer FREE memberships to those experiencing financial hardship and FREE memberships for students.

View all options
Comments
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Associate Editor:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front End Developer:
Senior Designer: