UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson Returning To Work After COVID-19 Recovery

FILE - In this Sunday March 22, 2020 file photo British Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures during his daily COVID 19 coronavirus press briefing to announce new measures to limit the spread of the virus, at Downing Street in London.  The British prime minister’s office says Boris Johnson will return to work Monday April 27, 2020, two weeks after he was discharged from a London hospital where he was treated for the new coronavirus. (Ian Vogler / Pool via AP, File)
FILE - In this Sunday March 22, 2020 file photo British Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures during his daily COVID 19 coronavirus press briefing to announce new measures to limit the spread of the virus, at Downing... FILE - In this Sunday March 22, 2020 file photo British Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures during his daily COVID 19 coronavirus press briefing to announce new measures to limit the spread of the virus, at Downing Street in London. The British prime minister's office says Boris Johnson will return to work Monday April 27, 2020, two weeks after he was discharged from a London hospital where he was treated for the new coronavirus. (Ian Vogler / Pool via AP, File) MORE LESS
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LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is returning to work after recovering from a coronavirus infection that put him in intensive care, with his government facing growing criticism over the deaths and disruption the virus has caused.

Johnson’s office said he would be back at his desk in 10 Downing St. on Monday, two weeks after he was released from a London hospital. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, who has been standing in for the prime minister, said Sunday that Johnson was “raring to go.”

Britain has recorded more than 20,000 deaths among people hospitalized with COVID-19, the fifth country in the world to reach that total. Thousands more are thought to have died in nursing homes.

Johnson, 55, spent a week at St. Thomas’ Hospital, including three nights in intensive care, where he was given oxygen and watched around the clock by medical workers. After he was released on April 12, he recorded a video message thanking staff at the hospital for saving his life.

Johnson has not been seen in public since, as he recovered at Chequers, the prime minister’s country retreat outside London.

Opposition politicians say Britain’s coronavirus death toll could have been lower if Johnson’s Conservative government had imposed a nationwide lockdown sooner. They are also demanding to know when and how the government will ease the restrictions that were imposed March 23 and run to at least May 7.

“Decisions need to be taken quicker and communication with the public needs to be clearer,” opposition Labour Party leader Keir Starmer said in a letter to Johnson.

“The British public have made great sacrifices to make the lockdown work,” he wrote. “They deserve to be part of an adult conversation about what comes next.”

Despite the toll, which saw another 813 virus-related deaths announced Saturday, some in Britain are growing impatient with the restrictions, which have brought much of the economy and daily life to a halt. Road traffic has begun to creep up after plummeting when the lockdown first was imposed, and some businesses have begun to reopen after implementing social-distancing measures.

Scientists say the U.K. has reached the peak of the pandemic but is not yet out of danger. The number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 is declining and the number of daily deaths peaked on April 8.

But with hundreds of new deaths announced each day, some health experts say Britain could eventually have the highest virus death toll in Europe.

As fears recede that the health system will be overwhelmed, opponents are criticizing Johnson’s government over shortages of protective equipment for medical workers and a lack of testing for the virus. More than 100 infected medical workers have died so far.

The government has promised to conduct 100,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of the month, but has yet to reach even 30,000 a day. Increasing testing, so that all people with the virus can be identified and their contacts traced and isolated, is key to loosening the lockdown.

The British government says all health care staff and other essential workers can be tested if they show symptoms. It is rolling out almost 100 mobile testing sites, staffed by soldiers, to conduct tests at nursing homes, police stations, prisons and other sites.

In the first two days of expanded testing, however, the online system handling daily demand for the tests had exceeded the supply by early morning.

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Follow AP news coverage of the coronavirus pandemic at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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Notable Replies

  1. I’d love to see a photo of Fat Nixon with a “Protect Obamacare” placard in front of him.

    Guess the COVID-45 shit’s not real til it happens to you.

  2. I know every person is different but just how much can he return to work? My boss had a milder case than Johnson did and he is saying he still feels fatigued. He’s expecting to work a few hours each day this week when he returns.

  3. Oh, goodie. Maybe now he’ll get serious about this pandemic, just like tRump has and get down to business.
    SMH


    (When he was mayor of London during the 2012 Olympics. I must’ve missed this spectacle at the time.)

    So many clowns. So little laughter.

  4. So basically the same as US.

    The main difference is Johnson’s government explicitly and rather coherently made the decision to burn through to herd immunity by letting the bodies fall where they may – working poor and POC typically don’t vote Tory after all – but then chickened out whereas Trump’s government made the same decision implicitly and incoherently (as usual) with pretty much the same result except amplified rather than tempered by incompetence.

    ETA: Note that, in the case of COVID-19, being late and sloppy is close enough to never as to make scant difference. Also note that the classist/racist assumptions underlying the implicit Conservative calculus is actually not that favorable given the demographic profile(s) of their typical voter; e.g., older, fatter, and less healthy than average.

  5. Avatar for tsp tsp says:

    Well, the good news is that getting Covid-19 is not a death sentence.
    The bad news is that Boris Johnson is returning to work.

    Sordid Sunday, everyone.

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