Trump Snaps At Reporter When Asked To Give A Message To Scared Americans

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump looks on as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci speaks during a press conference about the coronavirus outbrea... WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 17: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump looks on as National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci speaks during a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration is considering an $850 billion stimulus package to counter the economic fallout as the coronavirus spreads. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) MORE LESS

President Donald Trump called NBC journalist Peter Alexander a “terrible reporter” asking a “very nasty question” at a press conference Friday after Alexander prompted him to give a message to Americans scared by the rapid spread of the coronavirus.

“I think it’s a very bad signal you’re putting out to the American people,” Trump continued, standing next to a stone-faced Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “The American people are looking for answers, and they’re looking for hope. And you’re doing sensationalism and the same with NBC and ‘con-cast.’ I don’t call it Comcast, I call it ‘con-cast.'”

Alexander looked on, astonished, as Trump continued his tirade.

“Let me just say something, that’s really bad reporting,” the President concluded. “And you ought to get back to reporting instead of sensationalism.”

Trump added that Alexander should be “ashamed of himself.”

Alexander seems to have set off the President with his series of questions about drugs that might help treat the more serious symptoms of coronavirus.

He pushed the President on his unbridled optimism about the possible effect of such drugs, as compared to Fauci’s more measured cautiousness.

Fauci had said that there is no “magic drug” for coronavirus, a statement Trump said he disagreed with.

“Is it possible that your impulse to put a positive spin on things may be giving Americans a false sense of hope?” Alexander asked, which Trump pushed back against before launching into his set of insults.

“Let’s see if it works. It might and might not,” Trump said. “I happen to feel good about it. But who knows? I have been right a lot.”

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