‘Straight Pride’ Organizers Call 911 Over Envelopes That Turn Out To Be Full Of Glitter

TOPSHOT - A Turkish anti-riot police officer steps on a rainbow flag during a rally staged by the LGBT community on Istiklal avenue in Istanbul on June 19, 2016. Turkish riot police fired rubber bullets and tear gas ... TOPSHOT - A Turkish anti-riot police officer steps on a rainbow flag during a rally staged by the LGBT community on Istiklal avenue in Istanbul on June 19, 2016. Turkish riot police fired rubber bullets and tear gas to break up a rally staged by the LGBT community in Istanbul on June 19 in defiance of a ban. Several hundred police surrounded the main Taksim Square -- where all demonstrations have been banned since 2013 -- to prevent the "Trans Pride" event taking place during Ramadan. / AFP / OZAN KOSE (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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July 2, 2019 2:04 p.m.

The organizers of Boston’s “Straight Pride” march alerted law enforcement about several suspicious envelopes on Monday – only to find out the letters were filled with glitter.

Three members of “Super Happy Fun America,” the group behind the march, received envelopes without return addresses in the mail that were filled a “granular” substance.

The vice president of Super Happy Fun America told CNN that a law enforcement official later informed him that the substance was glitter.

Samson Racioppi, Super Happy Fun America’s interim treasurer, told TPM his letter led to a “big scene” after he called 911. Complaining that the ordeal was a “huge inconvenience,” Racioppi said he didn’t find out the envelopes contained glitter until he read about it in the news.

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“My neighbors are now probably pretty irritated with me,” he said while describing himself and his glittered associates as “victims.”

Racioppi lamented the “violence” they received at the hands of the anonymous glitter-sender.

“I wouldn’t wish this for anyone,” he said.

Glitter-bombing is a common form of protest from LGBTQ advocates. Anti-LGBT conservatives such as Newt Gringrich, Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT), and Michele Bachmann have found themselves publicly showered in glitter over the years.

Even though the members of Super Happy Fun America insist that they’re expressing their “sincerely held belief” that straight people are an “oppressed majority,” critics have slammed the march as a homophobic event that aims to troll the LGBTQ community. Far-right failed author Milo Yiannopoulos, a gay man who frequently espouses hateful rhetoric against racial and sexual minorities, is the march’s “mascot.”

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