‘NO SHAME’: GOP Senator Roasted For Praising COVID Relief Plan … He Voted Against

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 28: Chairman of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Roger Wicker attends the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing 'Does Section 230's Sweeping... WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 28: Chairman of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Roger Wicker attends the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing 'Does Section 230's Sweeping Immunity Enable Big Tech Bad Behavior?', on Capitol Hill, October 28, 2020 in Washington, DC. CEO of Twitter Jack Dorsey; CEO of Alphabet Inc. and its subsidiary Google LLC, Sundar Pichai; and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg all testified virtually at the hearing. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act guarantees that tech companies can not be sued for content on their platforms, but the Justice Department has suggested limiting this legislation. (Photo by Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images) MORE LESS

Hours after the House delivered President Biden’s first legislative victory by passing a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package on Wednesday, Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS) suddenly acted as though he did not vote against the plan last weekend alongside his fellow Republican senators — and was swiftly dragged by Twitter users for it.

In a Wednesday afternoon tweet, Wicker touted that the passage of the COVID-19 relief plan in Congress will deliver targeted relief to independent restaurant operators that have struggled amid the pandemic.

Pressed by CNN’s Manu Raju on his tweet shortly after posting it, Wicker defended his vote opposing the legislation last weekend by arguing that “one good provision” doesn’t mean he was obligated to “vote for the whole thing,” according to a Hill pool report.

Wicker quipped that it’s “a stupid question” to ask about his tweet touting the COVID-19 relief plan that he voted against.

“I’m not gonna vote for $1.9 trillion just because it has a couple of good provisions,” Wicker said, according to a Hill pool report.

Senate Democrats passed the package through reconciliation — which only required 51 votes and allowed Democrats to circumvent the filibuster — last weekend, Senate Republicans complained that the process was partisan, and deployed delay tactics such as forcing the entire bill to be read aloud and proposing a slew of amendments.

Twitter users were quick to call out the irony in Wicker’s praise for the COVID-19 relief plan that he voted against last weekend:

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