Roger Stone Requests New Trial Amid Presidential Meddling Scandal

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: Former advisor to U.S. President Donald Trump, Roger Stone departs the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse after being found guilty of obstructing a congressional investigatio... WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: Former advisor to U.S. President Donald Trump, Roger Stone departs the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse after being found guilty of obstructing a congressional investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election on November 15, 2019 in Washington, DC. Stone faced seven felony charges and was found guilty on all counts. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) MORE LESS
|
February 14, 2020 5:55 p.m.
EDITORS' NOTE: TPM is making our COVID-19 coverage free to all readers during this national health crisis. If you’d like to support TPM's reporters, editors and staff, the best way to do so is to become a member.

Roger Stone’s attorneys have requested a new trial amid fierce criticism in Washington that President Donald Trump exerted political pressure to help his friend and confidante.

The Washington Post reported the news Friday citing a sealed filing in Stone’s case. Stone’s legal reasoning for seeking a new trial isn’t known.

Trump himself in recent days has smeared the jury foreperson in Stone’s case based on her politics, even though Stone’s lawyers — like lawyers for every other criminal defendant — had a chance to vet jurors for potential bias at the start of his trial.

Stone was convicted by a jury in November of all seven counts against him, including for witness tampering and lying to Congress.

The career prosecutors on his case from the U.S. Attorney’s office for the District of Columbia initially recommended a 7–9 year prison sentence in a filing this week. But after an angry tweet from the President about the suggested sentence, Attorney General Barr had other prosecutors file a new, watered-down proposal.

Following the change, the four career prosecutors who made the initial sentencing recommendation withdrew from Stone’s case. One of them resigned entirely from the Justice Department.

Prosecutors were ordered to respond to Stone’s motion by Feb. 18.

Comments
advertisement
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Senior Editor:
Special Projects Editor:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Publishing Associate:
Front-End Developer:
Senior Designer: