Report Reveals Alleged Actions Of Capitol Police Officers Facing Jan. 6 Discipline

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06:  Riot police clear the hallway inside the Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Riot police clear the hallway inside the Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
|
September 15, 2021 10:38 a.m.

A report published Tuesday night sheds light on the alleged actions of some of the six Capitol Police officers facing disciplinary action for their behavior during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Documents obtained by McClatchy publicly reveal for the first time the nature of some of the alleged infractions that led to possible disciplinary action. While the department announced Saturday that disciplinary action had been recommended against six officers, the specific incidents of wrongdoing weren’t made public.

Three of the six officers allegedly took selfies with rioters. And one allegedly blabbed to a friend about the secure location to which lawmakers were evacuated during the attack. 

One of the selfie-taking officers reportedly told investigators that he did so in order to identify the rioter later — but that detail came only after the FBI informed Capitol Police that the officer appeared in photos that the bureau was using to obtain an arrest warrant for one of the rioters.

Newsletters
Get TPM in your inbox, twice weekly.
Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

The officer also didn’t use his own phone, nor did he obtain any information about the suspect. The officers who allegedly took selfies with rioters are accused of conduct unbecoming of an officer, McClatchy reported.

Another officer facing that charge became known as the “selfie officer,” McClatchy noted, because footage showed him taking photos with multiple people. 

That officer told investigators he wanted to diffuse the situation, McClatchy reported. 

“I can’t help what they do,” he said, according to the reported documents. “If you want to take a photo, I’m not going to say no because we are always told to interact and keep the situation calm.” 

One officer accused of improper dissemination of information — for allegedly talking with a friend about the secure location to which lawmakers were evacuated within the Capitol — said he couldn’t deny the allegation. 

“I can’t say one hundred percent that I didn’t do what you’re telling me I did,” the officer, a Protective Services Bureau special agent, reportedly told investigators.

The officer’s friend reportedly told Capitol Police in an interview that he and the officer had been friends for 40 years, but that the officer “says enough concerning statements that I feel like I need to do this… he’s just fallen into this cult and these beliefs.”  The officer denied being sympathetic to the rioters’ cause.

Latest News
Comments are now Members-Only

Non-members are still able to read comments, but will no longer be able to participate. To join the conversation, sign up now and get:

30% Off Annual Prime Membership

TPM strives to build as inclusive a community as financially possible. We offer FREE memberships to those experiencing financial hardship and FREE memberships for students.

View all options
Comments
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Associate Editor:
Investigations Desk:
Reporters:
Newswriters:
Audience Development Editor:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front End Developer:
Senior Designer: