Rand Paul To Go To Canada For Surgery Related To 2017 Attack By Neighbor

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23:  U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) waits for the beginning of a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting April 23, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee is scheduled to vote on the nomination of CIA Director Mike Pompeo to be the next Secretary of State.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) waits for the beginning of a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting April 23, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee is scheduled to vote on t... WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 23: U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) waits for the beginning of a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting April 23, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee is scheduled to vote on the nomination of CIA Director Mike Pompeo to be the next Secretary of State. After some hesitation, Sen. Paul has said he will support Pompeo for the position. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) MORE LESS
|
January 14, 2019 12:12 p.m.
JOIN TPM FOR JUST $1

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) will travel to Canada in late January to get hernia surgery, related to the attack he sustained from a neighbor in 2017, according to the Louisville Courier Journal.

Notably, Paul is adamantly against socialized medicine and has called the idea of a national public health care system “slavery.” Canada enjoys publicly funded universal health care, but the hospital Paul will visit is privately administered, his spokesperson said.

Communications director Kelsey Cooper called Shouldice Hernia Hospital “a private, world renowned hospital separate from any system and people come from around the world to pay cash for their services.”

There is some nuance here. Though Shouldice is a private, for-profit hospital, it does almost all of its work under contract with various provincial governments. Thus, the majority of the hospital’s income comes from patients who pay their bills through their government-funded health plans, according to the Globe and Mail.

Canadian citizens pay into the country’s single-payer health-care system through federal and provincial taxes. Each province or territory has a health-care plan under which they can get free care. (What the country has is similar to the Medicare-for-All concept endorsed by some Democrats.)

Private, for-profit hospitals were outlawed under Ontario’s 1973 Private Hospitals Act, but already-existing facilities, including Shouldice, were exempted.

This story was updating following comments from Sen. Paul’s spokesperson to clarify that the hospital in question is privately owned.

Comments
Masthead Masthead
Editor & Publisher:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Senior Editor:
Special Projects Editor:
Investigations Desk:
Reporter:
Senior Newswriters:
Newswriters:
Editor at Large:
General Manager & General Counsel:
Executive Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Publishing Associate:
Front-End Developer:
Senior Designer: