Cuomo Now Admits He Was Wrong To Downplay NYPD’s Excessive Use Of Force

ALBANY, NEW YORK - APRIL 7, 2020:New York Governor, Andrew Cuomo (D) speaking at a press Conference at the State Capitol.
ALBANY, NEW YORK - APRIL 7, 2020: New York Governor, Andrew Cuomo (D) speaking at a press Conference at the State Capitol.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Michael Brochstein / Echoes Wire/ Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo ... ALBANY, NEW YORK - APRIL 7, 2020: New York Governor, Andrew Cuomo (D) speaking at a press Conference at the State Capitol.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Michael Brochstein / Echoes Wire/ Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Michael Brochstein / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images) MORE LESS
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June 5, 2020 12:55 p.m.

Governor Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.) dramatically walked back his previous defense of the New York Police Department during a press conference Friday, admitting that video evidence documenting the excessive use of force to contain protests is verifiable and “undeniable.”

Cuomo’s Friday admission was a significant reversal from his remarks just a day earlier. When asked by reporters on Thursday about instances of police abuse — documented en masse in online videos that show police officers shoving and bludgeoning protesters, journalists, and passersby with batons — Cuomo instead accused the media of launching a partisan attack. He then admonished New Yorkers for showing “disrespect” for police.

“Police bludgeon peaceful protesters with batons for no reason? That’s not a fact,” Cuomo said Thursday. “They don’t do that. Anyone who did do that would be obviously reprehensible if not criminal.”

The governor pulled up a different set of facts during his Friday press conference when he flashed a video clip of a 75-year-old man in Buffalo, New York being pushed to the ground by police.

“These are undeniable situations,” Cuomo said, adding that he had spoken to the mayor of Buffalo and they agreed the officers involved should be immediately suspended.

Cuomo’s reversal on Friday comes after he swatted away questions earlier this week about graphic video footage collected from multiple sources that showed officers throwing demonstrators to the ground, beating passersby on bicycles and demonstrating an overwhelming show of force to constrain and dominate protesters.

New York Times reporter Ali Watkins captured the aftermath of what she described as undue force used by officers who charged at protesters.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, whose daughter was arrested while protesting Monday, has also praised the police for showing “tremendous restraint” toward protesters — a comment that sparked criticism from New Yorkers.

As marches against police brutality and the killing of George Floyd continued throughout the week, city officials, residents and de Blasio supporters called out the mayor and Police Commissioner Dermot F. Shea for painting such a watered down picture of police violence against protesters. Others decried the mayor’s lack of leadership and failure to support New Yorkers from needless attacks as they march for racial justice.

The city’s comptroller Scott Stringer said claiming ignorance about video evidence of police violence was “a total disgrace.”

Jumaane Williams, the city’s public advocate tweeted on Wednesday that he was “ashamed” of the mayor. Williams has posted videos on Twitter throughout the week — criticizing police for kettling protesters into narrow confines in a way that seemed to escalate conflict.

Responding to harsh widespread criticism of the NYPD’s handling of the protests and violence toward journalists in particular on Friday, the mayor said “I don’t know why” we’ve seen reporters being arrested, adding that it was not acceptable and further investigation would be pursued.

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