‘No Proof Of Anything’: Trump Unravels When Pressed On Migrant Conspiracies

WASHINGTON, Oct. 22, 2018  -- U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before departing from the White House in Washington D.C., the United States, on Oct. 22, 2018. Donald Trump said on Monday that his country will begin cutting off or reducing aid to three countries in Central America, citing migrant caravan heading to the U.S. border. (Xinhua/Ting Shen)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 22, 2018 -- U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before departing from the White House in Washington D.C., the United States, on Oct. 22, 2018. Donald Trump said on Monday that his countr... WASHINGTON, Oct. 22, 2018 -- U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters before departing from the White House in Washington D.C., the United States, on Oct. 22, 2018. Donald Trump said on Monday that his country will begin cutting off or reducing aid to three countries in Central America, citing migrant caravan heading to the U.S. border. (Xinhua/Ting Shen) (Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images) MORE LESS

President Donald Trump finally admitted Tuesday that he had “no proof” to support his blatant lies and conspiracy theories about the migrants and asylum-seekers traveling toward the U.S.-Mexico border.

The President also tried — and failed — to get Vice President Mike Pence to accuse Democrats of funding the caravan, and to say there were Islamic State members in the caravan.

Pence did say that, during a phone call earlier Tuesday, the vice president of Honduras had told him that the group “was organized by leftist organizations and financed by Venezuela.”

“What else did they say, Mike, about ISIS?” Trump attempted. “Did they say something?”

They hadn’t. Pence returned to talking about leftist groups.

Pressed earlier for proof for Democrats’ non-existent involvement with the caravan, Trump was similarly evasive.

“You’re going to find out. And we’re going to see. Maybe they made a bad mistake, too,” he said.

Watch below:

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