Greene Cancels Launch Of Nativist Caucus After Outcry From Fellow GOPers

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 5: Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 5: Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove ... WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 5: Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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April 18, 2021 11:40 a.m.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) is no longer planning to launch her “America First” caucus, which espoused nativity and white supremacist ideas, following backlash from other Republicans, according to CNN.

On Friday, Punchbowl News first reported on a document that appeared to provide an overview of the policy posture of the new “America First Caucus” tied to Reps. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) and Greene. The caucus document urges for a pause in immigration while invoking language of nativism and white supremacy. It also suggests that the United States is “strengthened by a common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and vows “to follow in President Trump’s footsteps.”

Nick Dyer, a spokesperson for Greene, said in a statement to CNN on Friday that the Georgia lawmaker would launch the caucus “very soon.”

However, Dyer issued a stark reversal a day after, telling CNN in an email on Saturday afternoon that Greene is not “launching anything.”

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“The Congresswoman wants to make clear that she is not launching anything. This was an early planning proposal and nothing was agreed to or approved,” Dyer told CNN in an email, referring to a flier promoting the caucus.

Dyer also denied that Greene approved the language in the flier, according to CNN.

In a series of tweets Saturday afternoon, Greene claimed that the staff-level draft proposal of her nativist caucus came “from an outside group that I hadn’t read.” Greene also baselessly blamed the media for spreading “false narratives” while touting herself as the purveyor of former President Trump’s “America First” agenda.

Greene’s reversal of launching her pro-nativist caucus comes on the heels of backlash from Republican leaders over her controversial caucus.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) stated in a Friday tweet that the Republican Party is not the party of “nativist dog whistles,” without mentioning the caucus directly.

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), the House GOP conference chair who urged fellow Republican lawmakers to “make clear that we aren’t the party of white supremacy” in response to the deadly Capitol insurrection in January, appeared to take aim at the Greene-led caucus in a tweet on Friday.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) suggested on Friday that members of Congress who join a newly-formed, far-right caucus that has espoused nativist and white supremacist ideas should be stripped of their committees.

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