Federal Judge Strikes Down Wisconsin Voter ID Law

Activists sing protest songs outside the House chamber in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 14, 2014. The group sang, chanted and cheered about a variety of issues ranging from voter ID laws to Medicaid expansion as la... Activists sing protest songs outside the House chamber in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 14, 2014. The group sang, chanted and cheered about a variety of issues ranging from voter ID laws to Medicaid expansion as lawmakers conducted their business within. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig) MORE LESS
Start your day with TPM.
Sign up for the Morning Memo newsletter

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A federal judge in Milwaukee has struck down Wisconsin’s voter Identification law, saying it unfairly burdens poor and minority voters.

U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman issued his long-awaited decision Tuesday. It invalidates Wisconsin’s law.

Wisconsin’s law would have required voters to show a state-issued photo ID at the polls. Supporters said it would cut down on voter fraud and boost public confidence in the integrity of the election process.

But Adelman sided with opponents, who said it disproportionately excluded poor and minority voters because they’re less likely to have photo IDs or the documents needed to get them.

Wisconsin’s law was only in effect for a 2012 primary before a Dane County judge declared it unconstitutional.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Latest News

Comments are not currently available for this post.

Continue Discussion
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Associate Editor:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front End Developer:
Senior Designer: