Judge Dismisses Dodge City Polling Site Lawsuit

A group of voters fill out their ballots at a table rather than wait for an empty voting booth Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2004, at the Civic Center in Dodge City, Kan. Depending on their precinct, voters had to wait in line to receive a ballot and some had to wait in line for an empty booth. (AP Photo/Dodge City Daily Globe, Michael Schweitzer)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2004, file photo, a group of voters fill out their ballots at a table rather than wait for an empty voting booth at the Civic Center in Dodge City, Kan. Access to the ballot box in Nov... FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2004, file photo, a group of voters fill out their ballots at a table rather than wait for an empty voting booth at the Civic Center in Dodge City, Kan. Access to the ballot box in November will be more difficult for some people in Dodge City, where Hispanics now make up 60 percent of its population and have remade an iconic Wild West town that once was the destination of cowboys and buffalo hunters who frequented the Long Branch Saloon. (Michael Schweitzer/Dodge City Daily Globe via AP, File) MORE LESS
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January 30, 2019 12:06 p.m.

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed against a western Kansas county after the only polling site in Dodge City was moved outside of town before the November election.

U.S. District Judge Daniel Crabtree on Wednesday granted an unopposed motion filed last week by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas to voluntarily dismiss the litigation.

The decision was made after Ford County Clerk Debbie Cox announced plans to open two voting sites in Dodge City for future elections.

The ACLU sued Cox in October, arguing that moving the polling site made it more difficult for the city’s majority Hispanic population to vote. Cox said she moved the site because of construction at the traditional polling site at the civic center in the mostly white part of town.

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