These Are The Russians Indicted For Hacking Democrats In 2016 Election

Damian Dovarganes/AP

A grand jury indictment stemming from special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe accuses 12 Russian intelligence officers of planning and carrying out the hacks into several Democratic campaign organizations in the 2016 election.

The Russian nationals listed in the indictment worked in two units of the Russian intelligence agency known as GRU to release stolen documents from the Democratic groups, according to the indictment.

Read the allegations made in the indictment about the the 12 officers:

Viktor Borisovich Netyksho was a GRU officer leading Unit 26165, which was responsible for hacking into the Democratic National Committee, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Hillary Clinton campaign, according to the indictment. The unit worked out of Moscow.

Boris Alekseyevich Antonov was a major in the Russian military who oversaw Unit 26165’s department in charge of targeting governmental and political groups with spear-phishing emails and other hacking tactics, according to the indictment.

Dimitriy Sergeyevich Badin was the assistant head of Antonov’s department within Unit 26165 and helped Antonov oversee other co-conspirators in the case, according to the indictment.

Ivan Sergeyevich Yermakov was part of Antonov’s department within Unit 26165, per the indictment. Beginning sometime around 2010, Yermakov used online personas like “Kate S. Milton,” “James McMorgans” and “Karen W. Millen” to carry out hacking attempts and helped hack at least two emails accounts that led to the released of campaign documents through DCLeaks in 2016, according to the indictment. He also helped hack the DNC server and steal DNC emails were were released through an organization not named in the indictment.

Alexsey Viktorovich Lukashev, a senior member of the Russian military and part of Antonov’s department within Unit 26165, used online personas including “Den Katenberg” and “Yuliana Martynova” and sent spear-phishing emails to members of the Clinton campaign, including the campaign’s chairman, John Podesta, per the indictment.

Sergey Aleksandrovich Morgachev was a lieutenant colonel in the Russian military who oversaw Unit 26165’s department in charge of developing and managing malware, including the hacking tool X-Agent used by the GRU, according to the indictment. Morgachev oversaw members of the department who developed X-Agent and monitored the malware implanted on computers in the DNC and DCCC networks, per the indictment.

Nikolay Yuryevich Kozachek, a member of Morgachev’s department, used the names “kazak” and “blablabla1234565” and helped develop and monitor X-Agent when it was used to hack into the DNC and DCCC networks beginning around April 2016, according to the indictment.

Pavel Vyacheslavovich Yershov, also a member of Morgachev’s unit, helped Kozacheck customize and text X-Agent before it was deployed, per the indictment.

Artem Andreyevich Malyshev was a second lieutenant in the Russian military and member of Morgachev’s unit who used the names “djangomagicdev” and “realblatr,” according to the indictment. Malyshev helped monitor X-Agent after it was implanted in the DNC and DCCC networks, per the indictment.

Aleksandr Vladimirovich Osadchuk was a colonel in the Russian military who led Unit 74455, which operated out of a building in Moscow referred to as “the Tower” by those in the GRU and handled the release of stolen documents, according to the indictment. The unit helped release documents under the names DCLeaks and Guccifer 2.0 and published anti-Clinton commentary on social media, per the indictment.

Aleksey Aleksandrovich Potemkin ran a department within Unit 74455 that managed computer infrastructure and social media accounts that were used to help release stolen documents through the personas DCLeaks and Guccifer 2.0.

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