Mulling A Possible Contested Convention, Pt. II

Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson (right) waves to a cheering throng in Chicago's International Amphitheater as then-President Truman steps aside after introducing the Democratic Presidential candidate for 1952. Stev... Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson (right) waves to a cheering throng in Chicago's International Amphitheater as then-President Truman steps aside after introducing the Democratic Presidential candidate for 1952. Stevenson was chosen by the party's third ballot of the National Convention. MORE LESS
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February 20, 2020 4:41 p.m.

Reader RS has a different perspective from AC — “ultimately, the party should be allowed to pick” who wins the nomination, he writes.

Here’s part of his email.

As far as I understand it, the Democratic Party has always required a majority vote at the Convention to nominate a candidate. If that doesn’t occur on the first ballot, pledged delegates are released and the deliberations continue. That reflects the desire to try, as best as possible, to get a consensus nominee.

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