Yet More Ballot High-Jinks In Minnesota

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January 23, 2009 1:22 p.m.
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One of the intriguing elements of the Minnesota election contest that we’ve been keeping track of is how the campaigns have a knack for taking legal action to help their own voters, and only their own voters. This might just be another example.

A group of seven voters from around Minnesota have now filed a new class action lawsuit to have their votes counted. Their absentee ballots were deemed to have been improperly rejected by the local election officials involved, but were individually vetoed by the two campaigns during that review process, under the terms of the state Supreme Court’s controversial opinion that gave them this power.

Attorney Bruce Kennedy, who is representing the seven voters, told TPMDC that one of the ballots was vetoed by the Coleman campaign, two by the Franken team, and he’s not aware at this time of the conditions affecting the other four. Kennedy is himself a political hand, having run for Secretary of State with the Independence Party in 2006, but said he is not undertaking this in association with any campaign.

The Franken campaign is now opposing the lawsuit, on the grounds that it has been filed too late in the process, while Coleman is supporting it.

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