Dennis Hastert Says He’s ‘Deeply Sorry’ For Decades-Old Misconduct

FILE - In this June 9, 2015 file photo, former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert arrives at the federal courthouse in Chicago for his arraignment on federal charges in his hush-money case. On Wednesday, March 16, 201... FILE - In this June 9, 2015 file photo, former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert arrives at the federal courthouse in Chicago for his arraignment on federal charges in his hush-money case. On Wednesday, March 16, 2016, the judge overseeing the case ordered an independent review of Hastert's medical records, a move that comes after the court granted a defense request to delay his sentencing on grounds he had nearly died and remained in poor health. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File) MORE LESS
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Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert (R-IL) said in a court filing Wednesday that he was “deeply sorry” for decades-old misconduct and “prepared to accept responsibility” for his actions.

A sentencing memo filed by Hastert’s lawyers, in which they asked for probation, did not specify the “unfortunate and harmful incidents he caused decades ago.”

Last year Hastert pleaded guilty in the federal hush-money case, which stemmed from Hastert paying a person identified only as “Individual A” millions of dollars to cover up prior misconduct. Several news outlets later reported, citing federal law enforcement sources, that the money was compensation for sexual abuse of a former male student at the Illinois high school where Hastert once taught.

“First and foremost, Mr. Hastert is deeply sorry and apologizes for his misconduct that occurred decades ago and the resulting harm he caused to others,” the filing read. “He regrets that he resorted to structuring the withdrawal of his money from banks in an effort to prevent the disclosure of that misconduct.”

The filing stated that Hastert apologized to “family, friends, former constituents, and all others affected by his misconduct” and that he was prepared to take responsibility for his actions and receive the court’s sentence.

Hastert’s lawyers further argued that their client’s health had declined after enduring public “shaming and humiliation of an unprecedented degree.”

Hastert’s sentencing hearing is scheduled for April 27.

This post has been updated.

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  1. Nothing says “I’m sorry” like an honest, heartfelt… filing.

  2. Avatar for paulw paulw says:

    He’s sorry for having gotten caught repeatedly, so that he no longer holds one of the most powerful offices in the country.

    And “unprecedented”? Just what level of public attacks would be appropriate for a hypocritical money-laundering child-molester?

  3. Avatar for oofda oofda says:

    I knew he was going to play the “decline in health” card when he shuffled into court, all hunched over. A ploy for sympathy, that’s all

  4. Before we get carried away with the “throw him in jail for the rest of his life” sentiment, let’s all try to remember that what he’s being sentenced for is “structuring” his cash withdrawals to avoid Federal reporting requirements, and then lying about it.

    He is not being sentenced for paying hush money. He is not being sentenced for sexually abusing teenagers several decades ago.

  5. He’s deeply sorry? I guess that settles it, then. What’s the latest on Benghazi?

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