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George Will's Latest: College Rape Charges Fueled By 'Sea Of Hormones And Alcohol'

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The Washington Post piece that started all the ruckus had attempted to debunk the White House's claim that one in every five women in college experiences sexual assault. Will wrote that efforts to address rape on campus have made "victimhood a coveted status."

"This is my job, is when dubious statistics become the basis of dubious and dangerous abandonment of due process," he said in the C-SPAN interview. "To step in and say, 'take a deep breath everybody.'"

Will explained that he took issue with the practice of adjudicating campus sexual assault cases by a "preponderance" of evidence, rather than hitting the bar of evidence beyond a reasonable doubt. That flies in the face of due process, he argued, and ultimately harms young men's future prospects.

"What's going to result is a lot of young men and young women in this sea of hormones and alcohol, that gets into so much trouble on campuses, you're going to have charges of sexual assault," he said. "And you're going to have young men disciplined, their lives often permanently and seriously blighted by this -- don't get into medical school, don't get to law school, all the rest."

Four Democratic senators reached out to Will after his column was published to torch the conservative columnist's "ancient beliefs." Will said he wrote a letter back to the senators and laid out his rebuttal in the C-SPAN interview.

"What I say is that: A) I take sexual assault more seriously than I think they do, because I agree that society has correctly said that rape is second only to murder as a serious felony," Will said. "And therefore, when someone is accused of rape, it should be reported to the criminal justice system that knows how to deal with this, not jerry-built, improvised campus processes."

"Second, I take, I think, sexual assault somewhat more seriously than the senators do because I think there's a danger now of defining sexual assault so broadly, so capaciously, that it begins to trivialize the seriousness of it," he added. "When remarks become sexual assault, improper touching -- bad, shouldn't be done, but it's not sexual assault."

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