In it, but not of it. TPM DC

Obamacare Opponents Who Won On Subsidies Ask SCOTUS To Take The Case

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AP Photo / Charles Dharapak

The backstory: one month ago a divided three-judge panel prohibited Obamacare subsidies for residents buying from the federal exchange. The Obama administration asked the full D.C. Circuit bench to rehear the case, which is reserved for matters of exceptional importance.

The challengers don't want that, because if they lose at the D.C. Circuit it would make the Supreme Court less likely to take the case.

"There is no doubt that this case is of great national importance. Not due to the legal principles at stake—this is a straightforward statutory construction case under well-established principles—but rather due to its policy implications for ongoing implementation of the Affordable Care Act ('ACA'). Those implications, however, are precisely why rehearing would not be appropriate here, as Judges of this Court have recognized in many analogous cases," the plaintiffs wrote in the brief filed Monday.

The Obama administration has an advantage in an en banc -- or full bench -- ruling: it would feature eight Democratic-appointed judges and five Republican-appointed judges. Now that the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of the federal subsidies, the only way the challengers can win is at the Supreme Court. The plaintiffs at the 4th Circuit have already asked the justices to take the case, which the Halbig plaintiffs pointed out.

"Only the Supreme Court can lift that doubt by giving a definitive answer to the challenge raised here (and in other suits)," they wrote in the brief.