Democrats’ Push For Additional Testimony Was DOA, And Other News: Your Prime Week-In-Review

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 29: The sun sets over the U.S. Capitol as the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump continues on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The trial entered the phase today where senators will have the opportunity to submit written questions to the House managers and President Trump's defense team. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 29: The sun sets over the U.S. Capitol as the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump continues on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The trial entered the phase today where senat... WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 29: The sun sets over the U.S. Capitol as the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump continues on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The trial entered the phase today where senators will have the opportunity to submit written questions to the House managers and President Trump's defense team. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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February 1, 2020 11:30 a.m.

Hello TPM Members,

With the failed vote to allow for additional witnesses and documents in the impeachment trial, Senate Republicans made one thing crystal clear: This is a sham.

Last night Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) forced a vote on four amendments, to drive home the shaminess of this sham — asking for, among other things, the Senate to subpoena former national security adviser John Bolton. Predictably, the amendments went nowhere in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Looking ahead to next week, we’ll see closing arguments from both sides, including speeches from senators Monday and Tuesday, and a final vote scheduled for 4 p.m. Wednesday.

It’s been a wild past few months covering the ins and outs of this historic process. Thanks for sticking around until the bitter, predictable end.

Here’s what happened in Prime this week:

  • Tierney Sneed provided us with some priceless Prime articles from inside the chamber this week, including behind-the-scenes looks at how the John Bolton allegations affected trial proceedings; the setup and vibe of the senators’ Q&A session; and how Nadler’s aides helped him rapidly respond to a question about Federalist 65.
  • The new John Bolton allegation that surfaced this week raised some questions about what White House lawyers knew about the explosive claims and when they knew it. Matt Shuham breaks that down for us here.
  • Josh Marshall combs through some new polling data that suggest impeachment is becoming more popular among voters.
  • During a 2018 dinner with President Trump, indicted Rudy Giuliani associates Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman discussed little else besides the various schemes that they hoped to push forward at the time.
  • John Bolton doesn’t actually get executive privilege. Here’s why.
  • Kate Riga debunks the GOP argument that it was the House’s job to call witnesses.
  • A new ruling provided a massive victory for the voting rights of American Indian, Hispanic, and African American citizens in Arizona.
  • Constitutional law professor Richard Primus helps us understand why Alan Dershowitz’s initial constitutional case fell flat.
  • As the Trump impeachment team wrapped up its legal defense earlier this week, Cleveland-based lawyer James Robenalt broke down why the lawyers’ case was so ineffective.
  • Impeachment implications aside, the April 2018 Parnas and Fruman recording offers yet another glimpse at the chest-deep swamp muck in which the President so happily wallows.
  • Nicole Lafond explains the historic precedent for Chief Justice John Roberts possibly stepping in as a tie-breaker in the Senate.
  • After the witness vote fell flat on Friday, Tierney Sneed asks: Now what?
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