Surveillance Program Exposed By Snowden Has Quietly Shut Down Under Trump

U.S. President George W. Bush gestures visits  the National Security Agency in Fort Meade, Maryland January 25, 2006. Bush met workers and made remarks on American national security at the high-security installation, which he last visited in 2002. Photo by Brooks Kraft/Corbis
The National Security Agency (NSA) logo is shown on a computer screen inside the Threat Operations Center at the NSA in Fort Meade. U.S. President George W. Bush visited the ultra-secret National Security Agency on W... The National Security Agency (NSA) logo is shown on a computer screen inside the Threat Operations Center at the NSA in Fort Meade. U.S. President George W. Bush visited the ultra-secret National Security Agency on Wednesday to underscore the importance of his controversial order authorizing domestic surveillance without warrants. (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images) MORE LESS
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March 5, 2019 9:28 a.m.
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A National Security Agency program that reviews private citizens’ calls and text messages and was exposed by whistleblower Edward Snowden has quietly ended under the Trump administration, according to The New York Times. 

The program was introduced under the George W. Bush administration in response to 9-11 in order to monitor links between known terrorism suspects and their associates and to prevent terrorist attacks, which it has never done.

After Snowden exposed the invasive nature of the program in 2013, Congress ended it and replaced it with the U.S.A. Freedom Act in 2015. That program is set to expire in December, but it is unclear if the Trump administration will even request its renewal, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s national security adviser Luke Murry said in a recent Lawfare podcast. 

A spokesperson for McCarthy pushed back on Murry’s claims, telling the Times the remarks were not reflective of what Congress or the White House plans to do with the program.

Read the full Times report here. 

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