SCOTUS Rejects Appeal Of Kavanaugh Ruling That Struck Down Obama EPA Rule

US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh listens during the first day of his confirmation hearing in front of the US Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Su... US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh listens during the first day of his confirmation hearing in front of the US Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to face punishing questioning from Democrats this week over his endorsement of presidential immunity and his opposition to abortion. Some two dozen witnesses are lined up to argue for and against confirming Kavanaugh, who could swing the nine-member high court decidedly in conservatives' favor for years to come. Democrats have mobilized heavily to prevent his approval. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images) MORE LESS
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October 9, 2018 10:12 a.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to review an environmental ruling written by Brett Kavanaugh in his former role as an appeals court judge.

The justices on Tuesday left in place an August 2017 ruling the new Supreme Court justice wrote that struck down an Obama-era Environmental Protection Agency rule. That rule was intended to limit the release of a class of chemicals that contribute to global warming.

Kavanaugh wrote that EPA lacks the authority to regulate the chemicals under a part of the Clean Air Act that addresses ozone-depleting chemicals.

The chemicals are hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs. They are industrial chemicals primarily used in cooling that replaced ozone-eating compounds.

The Trump administration says it agrees with the appellate ruling and that a new rule is in the works.

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