Kan. Senate Leader: Anti-Gay Marriage Bill Won’t Pass

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Kansas Senate will not pass a bill in its current form that would prevent lawsuits against someone who refuses, for religious reasons, to provide services to gays and lesbians, the chamber’s president said Friday.

Senate President Susan Wagle said the bill, which was approved Wednesday in the Kansas House, goes beyond protecting religious freedom. She raised concerns about discrimination and how it could impact businesses that would refuse services to gay couples.

“I believe the intent of the House was to protect religious liberties. We respect that, but the business implications are going to harm the practice of employment in Kansas,” said Wagle, a Wichita Republican.

The measure would prohibit government sanctions or lawsuits over faith-based refusals to recognize same-sex unions or to provide goods, services, accommodations or employment benefits to couples.

The House’s passage of the measure prompted strong reactions across the country. House Speaker Ray Merrick has scheduled a news conference for Friday afternoon, where he’s expected to address the bill.

Wagle said most Republican senators support traditional marriage and protecting religious freedom. However, she said any bill that would come up for vote would not contain a section relating to government services that could be denied to couples on religious grounds.

The executive director of the state’s leading gay rights group welcomed Wagle’s words.

“Equality Kansas proposed amendments in the House that we believe would have made the bill more acceptable,” said Thomas Witt, who’s the head of the Equality Kansas coalition. “If the Senate chooses to move forward with hearings, we look forward to working with them to draft language that will protect the religious liberties of all Kansans, while at the same time ensuring the dignity of gay and lesbian couples across the state.”

Most Senate Democrats oppose the House bill and think the issue should be left alone this session.

“I think she made the right decision,” said Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, a Topeka Democrat. “I don’t think there is any sense in trying to beat a dead horse on this bill that basically legalizes discrimination.”

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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