Justice Ginsburg Has Surgery To Remove Cancerous Growths

US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks after receiving the American Law Institute's Henry J. Friendly Medal in Washington, DC, on May 14, 2018. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should rea... US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks after receiving the American Law Institute's Henry J. Friendly Medal in Washington, DC, on May 14, 2018. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images) MORE LESS
|
December 21, 2018 12:55 p.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had surgery Friday to remove two malignant growths in her left lung, the Supreme Court said.

It is the 85-year-old Ginsburg’s third bout with cancer since joining the court in 1993.

Doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York found “no evidence of any remaining disease” and scans taken before the surgery showed no cancerous growths elsewhere in her body, the court said in a statement. No additional treatment is currently planned, the court said.

Ginsburg, who leads the court’s liberal wing, is expected to remain in the hospital for a few days, the court said.

The growths were found during tests Ginsburg had after she fractured ribs in a fall in her Supreme Court office on Nov. 7.

The court’s oldest justice had surgery for colorectal cancer in 1999 and pancreatic cancer 10 years later.

Among other health problems, she also broke two ribs in a fall in 2012 and had a stent implanted to open a blocked artery in 2014. She was hospitalized after a bad reaction to medicine in 2009.

Ginsburg has never missed Supreme Court arguments in more than 25 years on the bench. The court won’t hear arguments again until Jan. 7.

Appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993, Ginsburg rebuffed suggestions from some liberals that she should step down in the first two years of President Barack Obama’s second term, when Democrats controlled the Senate and would have been likely to confirm her successor.

She already has hired clerks for the term that extends into 2020, indicating she has no plans to retire.

Support The TPM Journalism Fund
  • Contributions allow us to hire more journalists
  • Contributions allow us to provide free memberships to those who cannot afford them
  • Contributions support independent, non-corporate journalism
Comments
advertisement
Masthead Masthead
Founder & Editor-in-Chief:
Executive Editor:
Managing Editor:
Senior Editor:
Special Projects Editor:
Editor at Large:
General Counsel:
Publisher:
Head of Product:
Director of Technology:
Associate Publisher:
Front-End Developer:
Senior Designer:
SPECIAL DEAL FOR PAST TPM MEMBERS
40% OFF AN ANNUAL PRIME MEMBERSHIP
REJOIN FOR JUST $30