Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas Stephen Miller’s Phone Records … From His Parents’ Family Plan

WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 20: White House Senior Policy Advisor Stephen Miller is interviewed on FOX News outside the West Wing of the White House August 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. Miller said that if Democrats are el... WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 20: White House Senior Policy Advisor Stephen Miller is interviewed on FOX News outside the West Wing of the White House August 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. Miller said that if Democrats are elected to Congress and the White House in November then all cities will defund their police departments and be turned over to violent criminals. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) MORE LESS

The Jan. 6 Select Committee recently subpoenaed the phone records of Stephen Miller, who formerly served as a senior adviser in former President Trump’s White House. The committee’s months-old subpoena was revealed in a lawsuit Miller filed in response to the committee’s request on Wednesday.

In the lawsuit, Miller claimed that T-Mobile received a subpoena for his phone records under his parents’ family plan, an account registered under the name “Carron Drive Apartments LP.” That is apparently the name of an entity run by Millers’ parents that the suit describes as a “real company based in California.” The lawsuit indicated that Miller is among the children listed under the phone plan. The complaint also said that several members who are part of the “Family Account Plan” are practicing attorneys who “use their phones for privileged call and text communications with clients and to otherwise conduct their law practices.”

Miller’s suit revealed that in a letter dated Feb. 28 and addressed to “Carron Drive,” T-Mobile notified the account that it had been served a subpoena by the Jan. 6 committee. The subpoena requested T-Mobile produce subscriber information as well as “connection records and records of session times and durations” from Nov. 1, 2020 to Jan. 31 2021 for the number assigned to Miller’s phone.

According to Miller’s complaint, T-Mobile stated in its letter that it intends to comply with the committee’s subpoena and that it would produce records for the panel on March 11, unless “Carron Drive” filed a motion to refuse compliance with the subpoena.

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Miller joins other Trump allies who allege that the committee lacks the authority to obtain records requested in its subpoenas.

“The subpoena is overly broad and seeks information that is unrelated to the purposes whereby Congress established the Select Committee,” Miller wrote in the lawsuit. “Moreover, the Subpoena violates Mr. Miller’s protections under the First and Fourth Amendments to the United States Constitution, as well as federal law.”

Miller also argued that the committee’s subpoena could include private conversations “with doctors and other healthcare professionals regarding the serious medical complications that his wife and baby daughter experienced” before the birth of their child in Nov. 2020.

The committee reportedly subpoenaed Miller in November in an effort to find out more about his role in pushing former President Trump’s election fraud falsehoods. Additionally, investigators are interested in Miller’s potential involvement in a quixotic plot by Trump-backers to act as supposed alternate electors for Trump in 2020.

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