Bubonic Plague Case Emerges In China’s Inner Mongolia Region, Authorities Report

HOHHOT, May 12, 2020 -- Luo Mingchuan L works with his colleague at an operating room of the maternity and child healthcare hospital in Hohhot, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, May 11, 2020. Luo Mingchuan, 28, is a nurse working at the maternity and child healthcare hospital of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Amid the COVID-19 outbreak, Luo volunteered to go to central China's Hubei Province to aid the novel coronavirus control efforts there. At the Jianghan temporary hospital in Hubei, Luo has witnessed that patients' condition were improved both physically and mentally. Patients and medical workers have forged a strong relationship by fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic together. "It's great to see my patients get recovered and discharged from the hospital, and it's a touching moment when we waved goodbye," Luo said, "Working in Wuhan is an unforgettable experience, which has made me become more mature." (Photo by Wei Jingyu/Xinhua via Getty)
Luo Mingchuan works with his colleague at an operating room of the maternity and child healthcare hospital in Hohhot, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region on May 11, 2020. (Xinhua/Wei Jingyu via Getty Images)
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July 6, 2020 8:05 a.m.

BEIJING (AP) — While China appears to have reduced coronavirus cases to near zero, other infectious threats remain, with local health authorities announcing a suspected bubonic plague case in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

Authorities in the Bayannur district raised the plague warning on Sunday, ordered residents not to hunt wild animals such as marmots and to send for treatment anyone with fever or showing other possible signs of infection.

Plague can be fatal in up to 90% of people infected if not treated, primarily with several types of antibiotics.

Pneumonic plague can develop from bubonic plague and results in a severe lung infection causing shortness of breath, headache and coughing.

China has largely eradicated plague, but occasional cases are still reported, especially among hunters coming into contact with fleas carrying the bacterium. The last major known outbreak was in 2009, when several people died in the town of Ziketan in Qinghai province on the Tibetan Plateau.

Along with the coronavirus, first detected in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, China has dealt with African swine fever, which has devastated pig herds.

China has gone weeks without reporting a new death from the coronavirus, and on Monday reported just one new case of local infection in the capital, Beijing.

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