House To Ask Federal Judge For Access To Mueller Grand Jury Info

UNITED STATES - JUNE 11: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., are seen during  a meeting with in the Capitol about funding for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on Tuesday, June 11, 2019. Comedian and advocate Jon Stewart and 9/11 responders attended the meeting. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 11: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., are seen during a meeting in the Capitol about funding for the September 11th Victim Compensati... UNITED STATES - JUNE 11: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., are seen during a meeting in the Capitol about funding for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on Tuesday, June 11, 2019. Comedian and advocate Jon Stewart and 9/11 responders attended the meeting. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call) MORE LESS
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The House of Representatives will file a petition to access the grand jury materials collected during the investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller, House Judiciary Committee chair Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) announced on Friday.

The filing will go to D.C. chief judge Beryl Howell this afternoon, Nadler said.

Nadler framed the move as a significant step in the prelude toward a potential impeachment inquiry into President Trump. During a press conference announcing the petition, Nadler suggested the panel is reviewing whether to open an impeachment inquiry.

“Because Department of Justice policies will not allow prosecution of a sitting president, the United States House of Representatives is the only institution of the federal government that can now hold President Trump accountable for these actions,” Nadler intoned.

President Trump’s Justice Department has denied the House access to the underlying grand jury material from the Mueller report. After Ken Starr’s report, Congress received the information within weeks.

During Watergate, the House Judiciary Committee applied to the chief judge at the time, who authorized the release of material from the Watergate grand jury, which had been empaneled by special prosecutor Leon Jaworski. In that case, the House Judiciary Committee had already opened an impeachment inquiry into President Richard Nixon.

Grand jury material is strictly protected under federal law from disclosure in order to protect the reputations of witnesses, uncharged third-parties, and the integrity of investigative proceedings.

But federal courts can permit disclosure of the material in limited circumstances.

Nadler said that his Committee had a responsibility to ensure accountability in the executive branch.

“We take that responsibility seriously, no one can be above the law, even President Trump,” he said.

Nadler was flanked by nine members of Congress at the Friday press conference announcing the move. All members present, except for Nadler, have called for the House to open an impeachment inquiry.

Recent reporting from the Hill has also suggested that Nadler supports opening such an inquiry, but has held his tongue amid opposition to impeachment from Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA).

“We will proceed when we have what we need to proceed,” Pelosi said at a Friday press conference before Nadler spoke, in response to a question about impeachment. “Not one day sooner.”

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  1. “We will proceed when we have what we need to proceed,” Pelosi said. “Not one day sooner.”

    Which is exactly why she is deliberately and strategically slow-walking everything. She hopes never to proceed. Here is the Mueller Report Timeline to-date:

    March 23: Mueller Report Issued

    March 25: Nadler writes letter requesting report by April 2

    March 29: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report

    March 29: Nadler says April 2 still stands

    April 2: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report

    April 3: The House Judiciary Committee votes to authorize subpoena for report

    April 3: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report

    April 18: Nadler issues subpoena for report to be delivered May 1

    April 29: Nadler targets May 15 for Mueller to testify

    May 1: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report and misses subpoena deadline

    May 3: Nadler sends a “counter-offer” letter with May 6 deadline

    May 6: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report

    May 6: House Judiciary Committee schedules vote to hold Barr in contempt on May 8

    May 6: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report; DOJ Invites Nadler To “Negotiation”

    May 7: Trump and Barr declare Report covered by Executive Privilege

    May 8: House Judiciary votes to hold Attorney General Barr in contempt

    May 9: Pelosi refuses to schedule full House vote on Contempt motion

    May 9: Barr Jokes About ‘Record’ Contempt Vote in speech at DOJ

    May 10: Nadler says Mueller will not appear on May 15

    May 11: Nadler sends an “offer to compromise” letter to Barr

    May 15: Barr jokes with Pelosi: 'Did you bring your handcuffs?'

    May 17: Nadler delays Muller testimony until June

    May 22: Still no House vote scheduled on Contempt motion

    May 23: Nadler says Muller wants to testify “privately”

    May 28: Mueller resigns. Pelosi still has not scheduled vote on Barr Contempt Motion

    May 31: Nadler said that he still wants Mueller to testify

    June 3: House vote Scheduled June 11 for on Barr Contempt Motion

    June 4: Hoyer reports Nadler is talking to Mueller

    June 4: Barr requests to re-open Mueller Report talks if Contempt Motion vote is stayed

    June 6: Nadler says could issue a subpoena to Mueller within two weeks

    June 10: Barr refuses to release un-redacted report; Nadler agrees to see what Barr deems “most important”

    June 11: The House authorizes the Judiciary Committee to “initiate civil litigation”

    June 25: Mueller agrees to testify in public on July 17.

    July 12: Congress still has not seen un-redacted Muller Report

    July 12: Mueller testimony delayed by at least a week.

    July 23: 4 months since Mueller Report was released

    July 24: Mueller testifies. Congress still has not seen un-redacted Muller Report

    July 26: Nadler announces House Judiciary is filing for Grand Jury info from Mueller Report

  2. [“Because Department of Justice policies will not allow prosecution of a sitting president, the United States House of Representatives is the only institution of the federal government that can now hold President Trump accountable for these actions,” Nadler intoned.]

    “Intoned” it is.

    And it’s the right word. That’s why he said “The United States House of Representatives” instead of “The House”.

  3. I’ve been pretty grumpy about TPM reporting lately, but this is a really nice piece. It should be the lead on the banner instead of the Pelosi-AOC drivel.

  4. I’m

    so

    tired

    of

    this

    snail’s

    pace

Continue the discussion at forums.talkingpointsmemo.com

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