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Americans and the Culture of Kings

Queen Elizabeth II stands in the 18th Century Room at Buckingham Palace in front of a 1771 portrait by Johann Zoffany of George III, who was king for 59 years (1760-1820).   * This photograph is one of a Golden Jubilee portfolio of photographs being unveiled to mark the 50th anniversary of the Queen's accession. The 18th Century Room is part of the Belgian Suite, used by visiting VIPs at Buckingham Palace - the official London residence of Queen Elizabeth II. 31/05/02 Photographers including the Earl of Lichfield and the rock star Bryan Adams were gathering today to see their Golden Jubilee portraits of the Queen go on public display.Seven photographers were scheduled to attend the National Portrait Gallery n London ahead of a free exhibition to mark the monarch's 50 years on the throne.   (Photo by Fiona Hanson - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)
Queen Elizabeth II stands in the 18th Century Room at Buckingham Palace in front of a 1771 portrait by Johann Zoffany of George III, who was king for 59 years (1760-1820). * This photograph is one of a Golden Jubil... Queen Elizabeth II stands in the 18th Century Room at Buckingham Palace in front of a 1771 portrait by Johann Zoffany of George III, who was king for 59 years (1760-1820). * This photograph is one of a Golden Jubilee portfolio of photographs being unveiled to mark the 50th anniversary of the Queen's accession. The 18th Century Room is part of the Belgian Suite, used by visiting VIPs at Buckingham Palace - the official London residence of Queen Elizabeth II. 31/05/02 Photographers including the Earl of Lichfield and the rock star Bryan Adams were gathering today to see their Golden Jubilee portraits of the Queen go on public display.Seven photographers were scheduled to attend the National Portrait Gallery n London ahead of a free exhibition to mark the monarch's 50 years on the throne. (Photo by Fiona Hanson - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images) MORE LESS
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March 22, 2021 1:38 p.m.

My take on the British monarchy is one of general indifference. They’re quaint. They’ve inspired countless costume dramas I’ve enjoyed immensely. I even have some small element of nostalgia for them in the same way I do for dragons or jousting tournaments. But mostly I don’t care about them in any way. But I’ve been struck by the recent efflorescence of pro-monarchism on the American right, something that seems to flow in this particular case downstream from hostility to Meghan Markle, but is yet part of something larger. In the midst of the Markle drama, Trump immigration czar Stephen Miller hopped on to Twitter to defend the monarchy as a symbol of national service and praise the royals he met during President Trump’s state visit as “unfailingly gracious and deeply committed to preserving the traditions and heritage of the UK.” (emphasis added). A week later The National Review published An American Defense of Britain’s Constitutional Monarchy.

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