Eurotrip: Hillary Clinton Visits Zurich, UK, Moscow

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton undertook a tour to Europe to stump for U.S. interests, from the war in Afghanistan to action on Iran to Irish peace. Here, Secretary of State Clinton is a witness to history in Zurich: Armenian Foreign Minister Edouard Nalbandian and Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu sign an agreement to normalize relations after the nearly-century old enmity between the countries. During World War I, Turks are widely believed to have instigated genocide against Armenians, though the Turkish government has denied that claim. The protocol was signed on October 10, 2009.

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October 13, 2009: In England, Clinton was a guest of Prime Minister Gordon Brown at his official country residence, Chequers, in Buckinghamshire.

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The interior of the embattled Prime Minister’s residence.

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In Belfast’s Stormont Castle, Clinton met with Northern Ireland’s First Minister Peter Robinson (left) and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness (right).

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October 13, 2009: Clinton and Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev talk in Moscow about Iran’s nuclear ambitions, along with other topics.

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Clinton and her Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov, announced that the two countries had also made considerable progress on a nuclear arms reduction treaty.

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At Moscow State University, Clinton made a passionate speech and called for cooperation between Russia and the U.S. “We have people in our government and you have people in your government who are still living in the past,” she said. “They don’t believe that the United States and Russia can cooperate to this extent. They do not trust each other. And we have to prove them wrong. That is our goal.”

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Moscow State University’s Rector Victor Sadovnichy gives Hillary Clinton a warm greeting.

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October 14, 2009: Kul Sharif mosque in Kazan, Russia, was Clinton’s next stop. Here she’s pictured with Tatar President Mintimer Shaimiev (second from left) and US Ambassador to Russia John Byerly (far right)

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Tatar President Shaimiev (left) and Clinton pay their respects to newlyweds outside the mosque.

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Inside the mosque, from left to right: Deputy chairman of the Tatarstan Muslim Religious Board Ramil Khazrat Yunusov, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Tatar President Mintimer Shaimiev

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Clinton lights a candle at the Annunciation Cathedral of the Kazan Kremlin on October 14, 2009.

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Clinton gives a quick talk to students of Kazan State University.

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Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov (left), Clinton and Lavrov unveil a statue of Walt Whitman.

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The statue is a gift from Adrian Fenty, the mayor of Washington, D.C. In exchange, Washington received a statue of Russia’s national poet, Alexander Pushkin.

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Of the unveiling, Clinton said: “Pushkin and Whitman reset poetry and we are resetting our relationships in the 21st century.” She also cited Whitman’s words: “‘You Russians, and we, Americans!… so far apart from each other, so seemingly different, and yet… in ways that are most important, our countries are so alike.'”

Newscom/UPI/Anatoli Zhdanov

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